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Publications & Reports

e-Accessibility in a Connected World



This G3ICT White Paper picks up and builds on the topics addressed at the 10th European e-Accessibility Forum, held on 30 May 2016 at the Cité des Sciences in Paris. e-Accessibility in a Connected World is a G3ict Business Case White Paper Series published in March 2017.

This White Paper explores such topics as:

  • The potential of the IoT to bridge the digital divide
  • How dialogue can be instigated between e-Accessibility stakeholders and industry to ensure that all IoT components are born accessible
  • Practical examples of how the IoT can and will improve the lives of disabled and elderly people
  • How e-Accessibility stakeholders can tackle security and privacy issues and install trust among disabled and elderly users
  • The need for standards to ensure that IoT solutions are accessible, robust and interoperable.

Smart Cities for All



Smart Cities for All, a Global Strategy for Digital Inclusion proposed by G3ict and World Enabled.

In June of 2016, G3ict and World Enabled launched the Defining Accessible Smart Cities initiative to understand how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are being made available to persons with disabilities in Smart Cities.

The G3ict and World Enabled initiative included three separate data gathering strategies: a survey of more than 250 Global Experts, a series of roundtable discussions in global Smart Cities (Barcelona, London, Quito, New York, and San Francisco), and one-on-one interviews with numerous Smart City program managers and technologists. 

This vision document outlines six key interrelated strategies that can address the barriers and priority steps identified by global experts to support more accessible Smart Cities.

User-Driven e-Accessibility



This G3ICT White Paper picks up and builds on the topics addressed at the 8th European e-Accessibility Forum, held on 31 March 2014 at the Cité des Sciences in Paris. Over 200 professionals, association members and scholars from around the world gathered on this occasion to discuss “User-driven e-Accessibility”. This is a G3ict Business Case White Paper Series published in April 2015. Document accessibility courtesy BarrierBreak, India.

This G3ict White Paper presents and discusses:
  • Real life case studies in which users are helping to shape and improve accessible ICT products and services;
  • The crossover between usability and accessibility and how UX practitioners, web designers, developers and their clients can ensure an optimum experience for all users;
  • How user-centric methodologies have the potential to enhance user experience by tailoring presentation, content and functionality to each individual user;
  • Examples of intelligent web service applications that empower users by allowing them to collect, enhance and share information tailored to their interests and to their needs;
  • How existing and planned legislation at both national and European level will help to ensure that all users have access to information, products and services on an equal footing.

Paratransit for Mobility-Impaired Persons in Developing Regions: Starting Up and Scaling Up



It is about addressing the need of persons with disabilities and others for paratransit service when accessible “fixed-route” bus or rail service is not available or, if available, cannot be used by persons who need more specialized transportation. Published by Access Exchange International, San Francisco | September 2012

This guide is written for city officials, transit operators, entrepreneurs, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), social service agencies, and others who may wish to start up or expand door-to-door paratransit services to help mobility-impaired persons to get to where they need to go. this guide provides information and guidance for cities and towns and villages in less-wealthy regions faced with many barriers to such transportation. These barriers are so great that many cities, to say nothing of the countryside beyond these cities, have not begun to address the task of providing paratransit for those who most need it.

Simple Things, Done Well: Making Practical Progress on Digital Engagement and Inclusion



Integrating the most vulnerable and excluded into digital public services is crucial for a dynamic, efficient and inclusive digital-by-default government. The government should also recognize, support and strengthen the already available resources for helping vulnerable groups, and can achieve this through the use of technology. Published by Policy Exchange 2012

The internet provides great potential for public service delivery, including for greater personalisation, speedier service and substantial cost savings. The transformation of public services must happen because the internet has become a pervasive feature of modern society. With 76 percent of people online at home and 44 percent of people accessing the internet on their smartphones, citizen expectations are rising and they expect more innovative use of technology in public service delivery.

Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations



This book explores the fundamental factors that are shaping the use of the Web for social and economic development. It describes the contributors that shape how the Internet grows, and how the Web can be made available to and effective for those billions in need. It addresses issues currently restricting access to the Web — political, technological, economic, cultural and linguistic — and suggests what mechanisms can be brought to bear to accelerate its utilization for poor and under-served populations.

This is a book about both ICTs and the World Wide Web. While the Web is one application of many existing on top of the Internet, it is the application that provides the principal window through which users increasingly access ICTs and which is evolving to permeate many aspects of daily life. It therefore deserves significant attention for its potential in making further significant contributions to assisting poor and underserved individuals and communities throughout the world.
 
Also read: Web Accessibility Policy Making: An International Perspective (3rd Edition, 2012). Download report.

Guidelines for the Development of Accessible Mobile Interfaces



More and more people are using touch screens and traditional mobile devices. Most are designed to work well for users with disabilities, with or without the need for assistive technology. Consequently, it is increasingly necessary for those who develop apps and mobile interfaces to know more about accessibility and the different needs that users may have | Funka Nu, Sweden | March 2012

Funka Nu’s work and services are based on the international Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (WCAG 2.0). Their experience of accessibility work and user testing with users with various needs and abilities, with and without assistive technology, show that WCAG 2.0 is not enough to provide accessibility as it lacks development principles for mobile interfaces. Funka has developed its own test criteria that supplements the international regulations.

Transforming Learning Through mEducation



Mobile technology is raising the quality of education and improving access to it. Early initiatives in mobile education, or “mEducation” are already enhancing learning outcomes worldwide. With growing availability and demand, mEducation is poised to become a USD 70 billion market by 2020 | GSMA and McKinsey & Company | 2012

We define mEducation as technology-enabled learning solutions available to learners anytime, anywhere. Any portable device, such as a tablet, laptop or mobile phone, that provides access to educational content through mobile connectivity (2G, 3G, or 4G complemented by mobile-based Wi-Fi) can be a tool for mEducation. Mobile technology’s power to transform education is difficult to overstate, given the importance and impact of learning that takes place outside a traditional classroom environment.

Accessible Publishing - Best Practice Guidelines for Publishers



The publishing landscape is becoming much more user-oriented; ensuring your published content is accessible by all your potential readers is more and more important. Providing “access” to content for people with print impairments is a challenge that all publishers can and should be tackling. The aim of this publication is to supply publishers with clear and concise guidance to assist them in these endeavors | April 2011

Making sure that your products are accessible makes good business sense, commercially, legally and ethically. With the right people, processes and practices in place you can increase the size of your market while at the same time enhancing your Corporate Social Responsibility profile at the same time. Our guidelines encourage publishers to make their mainstream publications as accessible as possible so that full access becomes the norm rather than being “special”.

Making Television Accessible - Polish Edition



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | Polish translation courtesy: National Broadcasting Council of Poland (Krajowej Rady Radiofonii i Telewizji) | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives, regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV.

Implementation of Universal Design for Learning and the Use of Accessible Technology to Improve the Learning of all Students



Statement report by Dr John B. Quick, superintendent of Bartholomew Consolidated Schools, Corporation (BCSC) in Columbus, Indiana to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions in February 2012

UDL is a curriculum designing tool that helps teachers design lessons that will be accessible to all students. There are three overarching principles (engagement, representation, and action and expression). Each is broken down into nine guidelines (three under each principle). The guidelines help teachers select teaching strategies, methods and accessible technologies, which will, when combined, create an accessible learning environment.
 
Because instructional goals might involve the use of technology, it is expected that teachers choose whether or not to utilize accessible technology to align with the standards-based goals they have determined for their lessons. Specifically, accessible technology must be chosen based on the framework of UDL.

Business Case Study: Costs and Benefits of Implementation of Dutch Webrichtlijnen



The focus of the study is on the potential costs and benefits of implementation of the national Dutch Webrichtlijnen (internationally known as W3C WCAG). Authors: Eric Velleman and Thea van der Geest from the Center for e-Government Studies - Universiteit Twente | November 2011 | Dutch & English versions

In 2004, the Dutch government published an extensive set of guidelines for the development of high quality, maintainable and usable websites. In 2011, the updated version including WCAG2.0 became part of the ‘comply or explain’ list of Dutch Standards. Both versions fully include the accessibility criteria that W3C (the organization governing the Web) has published for accessible web content.

In commission of ECP-EPN, Platform for the Information Society, the University of Twente is conducting a study on the potential costs and benefits of implementation of the national Dutch Webrichtlijnen. The focus of the study is on non-governmental organizations, like businesses, corporations, not-for-profit, charity organizations and other private parties. What is the cost-benefit of (starting to) comply with the Webrichtlijnen (internationally known as W3C WCAG with some added guidelines) and what is the yield of the implementation of this national, governmental standard?

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

In the midst of this telecommunication revolution, however, populations of senior citizens and persons living with disabilities have been left out due to accessibility factors: complex human interfaces difficult to understand and activate for persons with cognitive impairments or learning disabilities, lack of alternative communications for persons living with low vision, blind, hard of hearing or deaf, or, quite often handset ergonomics too difficult for persons with physical disabilities such as dexterity or mobility limitations.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

Making Television Accessible



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives,  regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons  organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV. 

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - Polish version  
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

 

Accessibility of Social Networking Services



Discapnet’s Observatory on ICT Accessibility has been carrying out sectoral studies on the accessibility of Web portals since 2004. This December 2010 report by Discapnet, Technosite and Fundacion ONCE, surveys present status of accessibility to social networking services for persons with disabilities.

Anybody with access to Internet and basic knowledge of how to use such tools is a potential user of social networking services. It is therefore a duty of the managers of such services to ensure accessibility, both to the services themselves and to the information they generate, under equal conditions for all users, including people with functional diversity.
 
The study on the Accessibility of Social Networking Services on Internet carried out by the Observatory offers a panorama of the current level of accessibility of the most widespread social networking services in Spain, with the aim of providing their managers with a diagnosis to help them improve accessibility, and their users with a breakdown of what each service has to offer.

Related Blog: Social Media and Accessibility by Debra Ruh. Read Here.

ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities - UNESCO IITE and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education



The Practice Review 'ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities' has been published as part of the IITE ‘ICTs in Education: Best Practices’ series.

How Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can be used in the most effective ways for education of people with disabilities is currently high on the political agendas of all countries, particularly those who have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (CRPD, 2006). A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate. In this context, the application of ICT is very important as it plays an essential role in supporting high quality education for learners with disabilities.

With this in mind, the UNESCO Institute for Information Technology in Education (UNESCO IITE) and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education (the Agency) agreed in 2010 to combine their expertise in this field and collaborate on the development of a Review of innovative practice. The intention for the review was to build on findings from past work – notably UNESCO IITE’s activities in this area and in particular ICTs in Education for People with Special Needs: Specialized Training Course (2006) and the Agency’s ICT in Special Needs Education project related work. 

Shifting Perspectives: Opening Up Museums and Galleries to Blind and Partially Sighted People



Shifting Perspectives: Opening up museums and galleries to blind and partially sighted people, a research initiative of CultureLink, supported by RNIB (2011)

The museum experience of disabled people is beginning to be talked of as a human and cultural right. Indeed, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by the UK in 2009, recognises the right of disabled people to take part in culture “on equal terms”. This is a major shift.

Shifting Perspectives, seeing disabled people as part of the design solution and not the problem, will renew museums. This user-focused report gives a step-by-step approach to making cultural institutions accessible to the blind and partially sighted people.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

Accessibility, Innovation and Sustainability at AT&T



A G3ict White Paper Documenting How Mobile Service Providers Can Serve Persons with Disabilities and Seniors

In order to promote the business practices required to provide accessible and assistive mobile equipment and services to persons with disabilities, G3ict requested that AT&T opens its doors to review and document its internal R&D and business processes for the benefit all interested parties. Read more.

 

National Accessibility Standard in the Russian Federation: A First Step toward Creating a Barrier-Free Internet



by Anatoliy D. Popko, Head of the Information Technology Department, “Rehacomp” on-Governmental Institution of Professional Rehabilitation and Training of the All-Russian Society of the Blind; Anatoliy J. Kamynin, Founder and Administrator of the Tiflocomp.ru portal, a leading Russian Internet resource on Adaptive Technology for the Blind and Visually Impaired, April 2010; Reproduced with the kind permission from the “Information Society Magazine” translated from Russian to English by UNIC Moscow.

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

AGE-ANEC-EDF Response to the European Commission's Communication "Towards an Accessible Information Society" (COM/2008/804 final)



AGE-ANEC-EDF Response to the European Commission's Communication "Towards an Accessible Information Society."

ICT have a crucial role to play in everyday life of consumers of all ages and abilities and are gateways to education, work and leisure. Therefore, AGE, the European Older People’s Platform, ANEC, the European consumer voice in standardisation, and the European Disability Forum (EDF) are responding to the European Commission (EC)’s Communication “Towards an accessible information society”.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

G3ict-ITU Toolkit for Policy Makers on e-Accessibility & Service Needs for Persons with Disabilities - Table of Contents



Designed to provide a comprehensive online resource for all stakeholders involved in implementing the digital accessibility agenda of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the G3ict ITU Toolkit is making good progress towards completion by the end of March 2009. The Toolkit was announced jointly by G3ict and ITU on April 21, 2008. The complete table of contents of the Toolkit can be downloaded here.

G3ict-ITU Toolkit for Policy Makers - Goals and Objectives



ITU-D and G3ict announced at their joint Global Forum (Geneva, April 21, 2008) that they would collaborate in the development of an online toolkit for policy makers on e-Accessibility.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, October 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this October 2008 issue focuses on a key piece of legislation, the Broadband Data Improvement Act that was signed into law this past month. The Act seeks to improve broadband deployment throughout the nation, especially in underserved areas by advancing federal data collection efforts to inform subsequent legislation and regulatory rulemakings. In addition, the law has the aim of enhancing economic development, furthering public safety in communities, improving health care and educational opportunities, and providing a better quality of life for all Americans through more comprehensive deployment of broadband services.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, September 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this September 2008 issue focuses on legislative activity addressing emerging technologies and accessibility by persons with disabilities.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, July/August 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this July/August 2008 issue focuses on legislative activity addressing emerging technologies and accessibility by persons with disabilities.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, May 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this May 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet hearing discussing the draft legislation "Enhancing Access to Broadband Technology and Services for Persons with Disabilities."

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, April 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this April 2008 issue focuses on how reducing wireless accessibility barriers has been a recurring theme in recent legislation in the U.S. Congress.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, March 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this March 2008 issue focuses on regulators at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and how the Commission raised a total of $19.592 billion in its auction of 700MHz airwaves that concluded March 19, 2008. Read below for more information on RERC Efforts in the AT&T Press Release:

RERC Efforts Acknowledged in AT&T Press Release

03.13.2008 - In an effort to encourage application developers and handset manufacturers to consider the needs of seniors or customers who have disabilities when designing products and services, AT&T Inc. announced through a press release that the company's approach to Universal Design will be made publicly available for the first time. AT&T embraces the concept of Universal Design and has urged its handset and software partners to consider this methodology as they develop wireless products and applications. AT&T's recently launched Mobile Speak and Mobile Magnifier applications are examples of accessible products and services that result from innovative collaboration and design.

In creating its Universal Design methodology, AT&T consulted with many leading experts, such as the Wireless RERC. By making AT&T's Universal Design methodology available on its website, the company is hoping all developers of wireless products and applications will consider how future designs can create accessible products, like Mobile Magnifier and Mobile Speak. "Integration of Universal Design into business practice is fundamental to our mission of equitable access to wireless technologies for people of all ages and abilities," said Jim Mueller, project director, User-Centered Research, Wireless RERC. "We're glad that AT&T shares our commitment and is making its Universal Design methodology publicly available."
AT&T's document on Universal Design

[http://developer.att.com/universaldesign].

AT&T's resources for people with disabilities [http://www.wireless.att.com/about/disability-resources/disability-resources.jsp]

[Source: AT&T]

Assessment of the Status of eAccessibility in Europe



This Executive Summary of Measuring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe (MeAC) is a report from a study commissioned by the European Commission in 2006 as a follow up to the eAccessibility Communication of 2005. The basic aim was the provide an evidence base to support the future deveopment of EU policy in the eAccessibility field.

Web Accessibility in Context, an Investigation into Standardisation Issues



This study has set out to investigate the apparent gap between current published guidelines on accessibility and the current practice of web developers, and the tools used by the developers to create accessible websites.

Speech by World Blind Union (WBU) President on the Occassion of the Launching of the "Global Right to Read" Campaign



Read the speech made by WBU President Dr. William Rowland in Amsterdam on Wednesday 23rd April 2008 on the occasion of WBU’s Press Conference launching the Global Right to Read Campaign. This document also contains a press release announcing the launch of the Global Right to Read Campaign.

State of the eNation Accessibility Reports: Social Networking Web sites



Today many services are only available, or offered at a discounted rate on the Internet. Other Web sites provide vital information or functionality. If a Web site doesn't meet a base level of accessibility then it will be impossible for a large number of disabled visitors to use. Many others with some sort of limiting condition will also have great difficulty.

 

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

Clas Thoren's Response to Professor Hajime Yamada’s Paper on ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures



Clas Thoren, Development Strategist at Verva, the Swedish Administrative Development Agency, offers a response to Professor Hajime Yamada's white paper on "ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures".


ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures



Professor Hajime Yamada of Toyo University explores the issue of third party versus self-certification of ICT accessibility standards.

Read Clas Thoren's, Development Strategist at Verva, the Swedish Administrative Development Agency, response to Professor Hajime Yamada's white paper on "ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures".