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G3ict Research Topics
Convention on the Rights of PWDs
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Publications & Reports

Smart Cities for All



Smart Cities for All, a Global Strategy for Digital Inclusion proposed by G3ict and World Enabled.

In June of 2016, G3ict and World Enabled launched the Defining Accessible Smart Cities initiative to understand how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are being made available to persons with disabilities in Smart Cities.

The G3ict and World Enabled initiative included three separate data gathering strategies: a survey of more than 250 Global Experts, a series of roundtable discussions in global Smart Cities (Barcelona, London, Quito, New York, and San Francisco), and one-on-one interviews with numerous Smart City program managers and technologists. 

This vision document outlines six key interrelated strategies that can address the barriers and priority steps identified by global experts to support more accessible Smart Cities.

Accessibility Requirements Suitable for Public Procurement of ICT Products and Services in Europe



This new standard (EN 301 549) is the first European Standard for accessible ICT. It is intended in particular for use by public authorities and other public sector bodies during procurement, to ensure that websites, software, digital devices are more accessible – so they may be used by persons with a wide range of abilities.

The new European Standard and its accompanying Technical Reports provide a framework for developing a wide range of applications that will make ICT products and services more accessible for the 80 million Europeans who are living with various types of disability. Potential applications include audio and/or tactile interfaces that can be used by visually impaired persons, or hardware such as smartphones and laptops that can be operated using one hand. Users of the present document should be aware that the document may be subject to revision or change of status. Information on the current status of this and other ETSI documents is available at http://www.etsi.org/technologies-clusters/technologies/human-factors?tab=2.

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities (Accessibilité de la téléphonie et des services mobiles pour les personnes handicapées)



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

Helping to Ensure Equal Access To Education



A major factor contributing to the growth of a country is the need to properly educate the next generation. In order for this to be done successfully, the needs of all students must be met, regardless of their race, sex or disability. This report from the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) discusses their improvements in addressing this issue. Published by the U.S. Department of Education - Office for Civil Rights, November 2012

The report cites three major themes that have been the focus of their new approach:

• Greater Productivity to Meet a Rising Caseload - new internal systems of management, enhancements to the  investigatory processes, increased the heft of their monitoring capacity and the scope of the issues it addresses
• Supporting Equity Throughout the Department - taking a leadership role in the Secretary's Equity and Excellence Commission, participation in Secretary Duncan's senior-most advisory and decision-making committees
• Maximum Impact, Maximum Engagement - published robust and reader-friendly policy guidance documents that provide schools and colleges with detailed interpretations of the laws they must follow

Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations



This book explores the fundamental factors that are shaping the use of the Web for social and economic development. It describes the contributors that shape how the Internet grows, and how the Web can be made available to and effective for those billions in need. It addresses issues currently restricting access to the Web — political, technological, economic, cultural and linguistic — and suggests what mechanisms can be brought to bear to accelerate its utilization for poor and under-served populations.

This is a book about both ICTs and the World Wide Web. While the Web is one application of many existing on top of the Internet, it is the application that provides the principal window through which users increasingly access ICTs and which is evolving to permeate many aspects of daily life. It therefore deserves significant attention for its potential in making further significant contributions to assisting poor and underserved individuals and communities throughout the world.
 
Also read: Web Accessibility Policy Making: An International Perspective (3rd Edition, 2012). Download report.

Disability Expectations: Investing in a Better Life, a Stronger Australia



The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) was put forward by the Productivity Commission in its report Disability Care and Support, which was submitted to government on 31 July 2011 and publicly released by the Prime Minister on 10 August 2011. The NDIS proposes a way forward for Australia.

PwC brought together an expert team with extensive experience in the disability support system. The aim of the group has been to answer the question “What is required to deliver the NDIS?” This paper provides a brief history of disability in Australia and, as part of its focus, draws on international experience and comparisons. Published by PwC | November 2011

Making Television Accessible - Polish Edition



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | Polish translation courtesy: National Broadcasting Council of Poland (Krajowej Rady Radiofonii i Telewizji) | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives, regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV.

Technology Accessibility in the Postsecondary Environment



Statement of Mark Turner, Director Center for Accessible Media, California State University, before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, “The Promise of Accessible Technology | February 7, 2012

The accessibility issues encountered by students with disabilities in a postsecondary environment are the result of a combination of factors including (1) the student’s specific functional impairments, (2) the specific instructional and administrative programs/services with which they interact, and (3) the level and nature of accessibility support provided by those programs/services. For this reason, the campus Disability Services program meets with each CSU student to establish an individualized plan of services that constitute ‘reasonable accommodations’.
 
These services are essential for the success of students with disabilities. By addressing accessibility gaps in university programs/services, postsecondary institutions ensure students have the opportunity to fully utilize curricular materials, demonstrate a mastery of their curriculum, and develop the skills necessary for future employment.

Internal Market for Inclusive and Assistive ICT, Targeted Market Analysis and Legislative Aspects



The report provides analysis of the market and the legal frameworks and implementation of support schemes (referred to as Service Delivery Models) for assistive ICT in nine EU Member States. The study has been commissioned by the European Commission, Directorate General for Information Society and Media, unit ICT for Inclusion. | June 2011

The aim of the study was to examine the main barriers and opportunities today in the European Internal Market for assistive ICT and look at what could be gained from addressing these. The study has assessed the different models existing in nine Member States for the provision of assistive ICT to people with a disability, analysed the demand- and supply side of the market and conducted a number of case studies. The study puts forward a number of scenarios, conclusions and recommendations for the achievement of the European Internal Market for assistive ICT that supports the digital inclusion of people with a disability.

The Promise of Accessible Technology: Challenges and Opportunities



Statement of Eve Hill, Senior Counselor to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights, Department of Justice presented before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, United States Senate concerning the "Promise of Accessible Technology: Challenges and Opportunities" | US Department of Justice | February 2012

Excerpt from the report: When Congress enaxted the ADA and Section 504, the internet and electronic and information technologies as we know them today – the ubiquitous sources of information, commerce, services, and activities – did not exist. For that reason, although the ADA and Section 504 guarantee the protection of the rights of individuals with disabilities in a broad array of activities, neither law expressly mentions the internet or contains specific requirements regarding developing technologies. When Congress amended the Rehabilitation Act in 1998, it added what is now known as section 508. That provision specifically requires Federal government agencies to ensure that their electronic and information technologies, including their websites, are accessible to individuals with disabilities.
 
Watch the video transcription of the Senate Committee meeting here.

Framework for Designing and Implementing Accessible Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Strategic Plans



This paper provides a framework that can be used to develop technical assistance tools to help employers (including government contractors) design, purchase, lease, maintain and use ICT that is accessible to and usable by people with disabilities and others. US Office of Disability Employment Policy | February 2012

As technology continues to transform the workplace, demand is growing for the development, purchase, maintenance and use of information and communication technology (ICT) that is accessible to and usable by all applicants and employees, including individuals with disabilities. Leading companies recognize that fostering an accessible workplace is the smart thing to do, both from a business standpoint and a legal perspective. 
 
The paper also includes a comprehensive Benchmarking Tool, llocated in the Appendix, which companies could use to conduct a self-assessment and create their own corporate-wide, comprehensive strategic plan (affirmative action program, where applicable), including accountability mechanisms and methods for ensuring continuous improvement. This Benchmarking Tool is organized in accordance with the key components of an Accessible ICT Strategic Plan outlined herein.

Caption Accuracy Metrics Project - Research into Automated Error Ranking of Real-time Captions in Live Television News Programs



Caption Accuracy Metrics Project report is produced by The Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media at WGBH (NCAM) | Authors: Tom Apone, Brad Botkin, Marcia Brooks and Larry Goldberg | September 2011

Real-time captioned news is a lifeline service for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, providing critical information about their local communities, national events and emergencies. The project scope was to: develop an industry standard approach to measuring caption quality, and use language-processing tools to create an automated caption accuracy assessment tool for real-time captions on live news programming.

ILO Report - Disability in the Workplace: Employers' Organizations and Business Networks



Employers’ organizations and business networks can play a major role in providing technical advice and services that help employers to hire, manage and retain employees with disabilities | ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities and Skills and Employability Department 2011

Disability in the Workplace: Employers’ Organizations and Business Networks provides insights into how representative organizations of business address the issue of disability. The practices described in these examples demonstrate how such organizations are well placed to link business interests and the productive integration of people with disabilities in the labour market. At a moment when countries are rapidly ratifying and seeking to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a comprehensive human rights convention for people with disabilities, there are increasing needs to provide inspiration and guidance for businesses. Disability in the Workplace: Employers’ Organizations and Business Networks responds to an emerging body of information that supports the business case for hiring people with disabilities and the interest of companies to maintain diverse workforces.

ILO Report - Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices



Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices describes the contemporary experiences of 25 companies and their work on the issue of disability | ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities and Skills and Employability Department 2010

Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices is timely for many reasons. It comes in the wake of a major global economic crisis, yet the companies profiled have nevertheless given strength to their disability and diversity initiatives. It provides inspiration and guidance to companies at a time when countries are ratifying and seeking to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities ‐ a comprehensive human rights Convention for people with disabilities that will require some changes in national policies and practices related to work and employment. Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices also responds to an emerging body of information that supports the business case for hiring people with disabilities and the interest of companies to maintain diverse workforces.

Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities



Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities | A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices by The Centre for Internet & Society, India and G3ict | December 2011

Universal Service definitions have been developed by 125 countries and are the foundation for policies and programs ensuring that telecommunications are available to all categories of population. Universal service funds are the main vehicle used to fund those programs, primarily addressing imbalances such as lack of availability of services in rural areas. While geographic coverage has vastly improved over the past decade with wireless infrastructure, the scope of Universal Service has expanded to include other categories of underserved populations.
 
This report aims to serve as a useful reference for policy makers, operators, organizations of persons with disabilities, and as a framework for good practice sharing among countries currently implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
 

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Television Accessible



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives,  regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons  organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV. 

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - Polish version  
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

 

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion



Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies | September 2011

While businesses sometimes encounter serious challenges as they seek to implement inclusion strategies, many employers have overcome these hurdles with robust and creative practices. Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies. This publication highlights successful strategies that can be used by businesses of all sizes to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. Real-life examples, such as these, are important to help businesses realize the wide range of opportunities available and the potential for replicating success.

FCC-EAAC Report on Emergency Calling for Persons with Disabilities, 2011



This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010

This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission), contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA), signed into law by President Obama on 8 October 2010.

The CVAA requires the Commission to take various steps to ensure that people with disabilities have access to emerging communications technologies in the 21st century. The Commission established the EAAC in accordance with the CVAA, which directs that an advisory committee be established within 60 days after the date of enactment, for the purpose of achieving equal access to emergency services by individuals with disabilities as part of our nation’s migration to a national Internet protocol-enabled emergency network, also known as the next generation 9-1-1 system.

Sightsavers Policy Paper - Making Inclusive Education a Reality



Sightsavers policy paper 'Making Inclusive Education a Reality' comprehensively discusses the merits of incorporating inclusive education in mainstream schools for children with visual impairment within the broader context of universal access to education.

Sightsavers policy paper 'Making Inclusive Education a Reality' comprehensively discusses the merits of incorporating inclusive education in mainstream schools for children with visual impairment within the broader context of universal access to education.

All people have a right to education. There is no single model for ensuring that ducation is inclusive and approaches continue to evolve. Inclusive education is an approach that ensures the presence, participation and achievement of all students in education. This may be in formal schools, or in non-formal places of learning, such as extra-curricular clubs and humanitarian camps. Sightsavers aim is to see increased access to an education system that fully meets the needs of visually impaired children and enables them to become productive and fulfilled members of society, whilst working to ensure that all disabled children have the opportunity to receive a quality education within a wider education system.

This policy paper was written by Juliette Myers and Sunit Bagree.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Accessibility, Innovation and Sustainability at AT&T



A G3ict White Paper Documenting How Mobile Service Providers Can Serve Persons with Disabilities and Seniors

In order to promote the business practices required to provide accessible and assistive mobile equipment and services to persons with disabilities, G3ict requested that AT&T opens its doors to review and document its internal R&D and business processes for the benefit all interested parties. Read more.

 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

Public Procurement of Accessible ICTs - Training Workshop Presentation



Public procurement is the process used by public agencies to acquire goods, services, works and other supplies. The use of procurement policies as a social justice vehicle is a modern development in government contract agreements

Compiled by Cynthia D. Waddell, ITU Senior Accessibility Consultant, Executive Director, International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet, this training workshop presentation was given at the "Asia-Pacific Regional Forum on Mainstreaming ICT Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities," organized by ITU and ESCAP in Bangkok, Thailand (25-27 August 2009).

Accessibility Criteria Defined by Voluntary French Charter (in French)




Wireless Phones: Survey of Users Needs (Georgia Tech Wireless RERC)



This is the second in a series of annual reports based on data collected from the Survey of User Needs (SUN), an ongoing survey conducted by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC).

The original Survey of User Needs (SUN1.0) was conducted from 2001-2006, with more than 1200 people responding to that survey. In 2007, the SUN was revised and data collection began with version 2.0 in April 2007.

By December 2007, over 1200 participants had completed SUN 2.0. A year later, another 348 respondents had completed the survey for a total of 1556. 1406 respondents reported one or more functional limitations such as difficulty in learning or remembering, difficulty in doing manual tasks, or difficulty in seeing or hearing. Download the report for survey findings.

AGE-ANEC-EDF Response to the European Commission's Communication "Towards an Accessible Information Society" (COM/2008/804 final)



AGE-ANEC-EDF Response to the European Commission's Communication "Towards an Accessible Information Society."

ICT have a crucial role to play in everyday life of consumers of all ages and abilities and are gateways to education, work and leisure. Therefore, AGE, the European Older People’s Platform, ANEC, the European consumer voice in standardisation, and the European Disability Forum (EDF) are responding to the European Commission (EC)’s Communication “Towards an accessible information society”.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

EU - Proposal for a Council Decision concerning the conclusion, by the European Community, of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol were adopted on 13 December 2006 by the United Nations General Assembly. On the basis of negotiating directives adopted by the Council on 24 May 2004, the Commission conducted the negotiation of the Convention on behalf of the European Community. The Council Decision dated 27 March 2007 (ST07404/07) authorized the Community to sign the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Commission signed the Convention on 30 March 2007. On 3 May 2008, the Convention and its Optional Protocol entered into force. Since the Optional Protocol has not yet been signed, its accession should be proposed. Two proposals, one for concluding the Convention, the other for acceding to the Optional Protocol, are therefore required.

EU - Proposal for a Council Decision Concerning the Conclusion, by the European Community, of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol were adopted on 13 December 2006 by the United Nations General Assembly. On the basis of negotiating directives adopted by the Council on 24 May 2004, the Commission conducted the negotiation of the Convention on behalf of the European Community. The Council Decision authorized the Community to conclude the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. On 3 May 2008, the Convention and its Optional Protocol entered into force. Since the Optional Protocol has not yet been signed, its accession should be proposed.

EU - Proposal for a Council Directive on Implementing the Principle of Equal Treatment



The aim of this proposal is to implement the principle of equal treatment between persons irrespective of religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation outside the labor market. It sets out a framework for the prohibition of discrimination on these grounds and establishes a uniform minimum level of protection within the European Union for people who have suffered such discrimination. This proposal supplements the existing EC legal framework under which the prohibition of discrimination on grounds of religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation applies only to employment, occupation and vocational training.

EU - Total Conversation and Emergency Call 112



EU press release and packet regarding the EU announcement of stepped up efforts to use a single emergency phone number to call for assistance – 112 and implementing a pilot service, “Total Conversation”, making the 112 number accessible to all across Europe.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, May 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this May 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet hearing discussing the draft legislation "Enhancing Access to Broadband Technology and Services for Persons with Disabilities."

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, April 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this April 2008 issue focuses on how reducing wireless accessibility barriers has been a recurring theme in recent legislation in the U.S. Congress.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, March 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this March 2008 issue focuses on regulators at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and how the Commission raised a total of $19.592 billion in its auction of 700MHz airwaves that concluded March 19, 2008. Read below for more information on RERC Efforts in the AT&T Press Release:

RERC Efforts Acknowledged in AT&T Press Release

03.13.2008 - In an effort to encourage application developers and handset manufacturers to consider the needs of seniors or customers who have disabilities when designing products and services, AT&T Inc. announced through a press release that the company's approach to Universal Design will be made publicly available for the first time. AT&T embraces the concept of Universal Design and has urged its handset and software partners to consider this methodology as they develop wireless products and applications. AT&T's recently launched Mobile Speak and Mobile Magnifier applications are examples of accessible products and services that result from innovative collaboration and design.

In creating its Universal Design methodology, AT&T consulted with many leading experts, such as the Wireless RERC. By making AT&T's Universal Design methodology available on its website, the company is hoping all developers of wireless products and applications will consider how future designs can create accessible products, like Mobile Magnifier and Mobile Speak. "Integration of Universal Design into business practice is fundamental to our mission of equitable access to wireless technologies for people of all ages and abilities," said Jim Mueller, project director, User-Centered Research, Wireless RERC. "We're glad that AT&T shares our commitment and is making its Universal Design methodology publicly available."
AT&T's document on Universal Design

[http://developer.att.com/universaldesign].

AT&T's resources for people with disabilities [http://www.wireless.att.com/about/disability-resources/disability-resources.jsp]

[Source: AT&T]

Assessment of the Status of eAccessibility in Europe



This Executive Summary of Measuring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe (MeAC) is a report from a study commissioned by the European Commission in 2006 as a follow up to the eAccessibility Communication of 2005. The basic aim was the provide an evidence base to support the future deveopment of EU policy in the eAccessibility field.

Joint ANEC-EDF Position on eAccessibility



This joint ANEC/EDF position paper expresses views on the accessibility of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) products and services by consumers of all ages and abilities.

Web Accessibility in Context, an Investigation into Standardisation Issues



This study has set out to investigate the apparent gap between current published guidelines on accessibility and the current practice of web developers, and the tools used by the developers to create accessible websites.

Web Accessibility at General Electric



Preety Kumar, Founder, President, and CEO of Deque Systems, Inc., discusses the significance of web accessibility and how General Electric recognized the necessity of accessible techniques in regards to making Web sites accessible to persons with disabilities.

Speech by World Blind Union (WBU) President on the Occassion of the Launching of the "Global Right to Read" Campaign



Read the speech made by WBU President Dr. William Rowland in Amsterdam on Wednesday 23rd April 2008 on the occasion of WBU’s Press Conference launching the Global Right to Read Campaign. This document also contains a press release announcing the launch of the Global Right to Read Campaign.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

Clas Thoren's Response to Professor Hajime Yamada’s Paper on ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures



Clas Thoren, Development Strategist at Verva, the Swedish Administrative Development Agency, offers a response to Professor Hajime Yamada's white paper on "ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures".


European Commission's First Communication on the European e-Inclusion Initiative



European Commission's first communication on its European e-Inclusion Initiative.

ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures



Professor Hajime Yamada of Toyo University explores the issue of third party versus self-certification of ICT accessibility standards.

Read Clas Thoren's, Development Strategist at Verva, the Swedish Administrative Development Agency, response to Professor Hajime Yamada's white paper on "ICT Accessibility Standardization and Its Use in Policy Measures".

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.