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Publications & Reports

WSIS+10 Review and Strategic Directions for Building Inclusive Knowledge Societies for Persons with Disabilities



This report has been commissioned in the context of the approaching deadline of 2015 for the MDG (Millennium Development Goals) as defined by the United Nations General Assembly to assess the progress of actions initiated after the first and second WSIS (World Summit on Information Society) to promote the digital inclusion of persons with disabilities and to provide policy recommendations. Published by UNESCO | February 2013.

The objective of this report is to review the current status, analyze trends and emerging innovations in connection to the use by persons with disabilities of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to access information and knowledge, and to formulate recommendations that will help UNESCO and other partners in shaping its strategy.

Developing e-Accessibility as a Professional Skill



This white paper follows discussions from the 7th European e-Accessibility Forum organized by the Association BrailleNet and Universcience in Paris, France, on March 18, 2013. A G3ict Business Case White Paper Series | Published March 2014

The role of industry specialists and policymakers is paramount in fostering e-Accessibility as a professional skill. Governments and organizations wishing to see increased levels of e-Accessibility will need to act decisively to ensure professionals have access to quality educational resources.

Accessibility Requirements Suitable for Public Procurement of ICT Products and Services in Europe



This new standard (EN 301 549) is the first European Standard for accessible ICT. It is intended in particular for use by public authorities and other public sector bodies during procurement, to ensure that websites, software, digital devices are more accessible – so they may be used by persons with a wide range of abilities.

The new European Standard and its accompanying Technical Reports provide a framework for developing a wide range of applications that will make ICT products and services more accessible for the 80 million Europeans who are living with various types of disability. Potential applications include audio and/or tactile interfaces that can be used by visually impaired persons, or hardware such as smartphones and laptops that can be operated using one hand. Users of the present document should be aware that the document may be subject to revision or change of status. Information on the current status of this and other ETSI documents is available at http://www.etsi.org/technologies-clusters/technologies/human-factors?tab=2.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: G3ict's 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - Survey Conducted in Cooperation with DPI



A G3ict-DPI Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version (1 MB) | Third edition 2013

The CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report includes the latest data on 76 countries representing 81 percent of the World Population. 57 data points are monitored, measuring countries commitments, capacity to implement and actual results in ICT accessibility across the main areas of digital contents, applications and services.

The report offers disability advocates, governments, civil society and international organizations - monitoring the progress of the implementation of the Convention by States Parties - a unique benchmarking tool that collects data on country laws, policies, and programs pertaining to accessible and assistive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) around the globe.  All results are available cross-tabulated by region, level of income per capita of Human Development Index to facilitate benchmarking by advocates and policy makers.

»  Download a PDF Version | Order a hard copy

 

Report of the Expert Group Meeting on “E-Participation: Empowering People through Information Communication Technologies (ICTs)”



The outcomes of the meeting are intended to provide important inputs to the work of the Commission for Social Development, in particular demonstrating the impact of ICTs and e-Participation on people's empowerment and how they can be used as a means to implement the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. Published in 2013.

The Division for Social Policy and Development (DSPD) of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA), in collaboration with the Division for Public Administration and Development Management (DPADM) and the International
Telecommunication Union (ITU), organized an Expert Group Meeting on “E-Participation: Empowering People through Information Communication Technologies (ICTs)" from July 24-25 at ITU Headquarters in Geneva, as part of the preparations for the 52nd session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD) that will take place in February 2014 and to promote the 2013 theme of the Economic and Social Council Annual Ministerial Review on Science, technology and innovation - as well as culture - for sustainable development".

Putting e-Accessibility at the Core of Information Systems: Russian Version



This white paper follows discussions from the 6th European e-Accessibility Forum organized by the Association BrailleNet and Universcience in Paris, France, on March 26, 2012. This is a Business Case White Paper Series published by G3ict in March 2013. The Russian translation is courtesy UNIC Moscow.

This G3ict White Paper presents and discusses
• The notion that e-accessibility must no longer be approached as an afterthought but rather as a core component of information systems with the potential to increase business and performance;
• The importance of widely recognized standards and technical guidance;
• The need for industry leaders to rise to the challenge and provide all stakeholders, from designers to end users, with the necessary tools and training to make e-accessibility feasible in large organizations;
• The means to design, build and distribute accessible products and services; and
• The importance of implementing accessibility in the day-to-day activities of digital content and service providers.

Redefining the Digital Divide: Report from The Economist Intelligence Unit



Redefining the digital divide from a technological problem to one of usage gaps is important to better understand the path towards a more inclusive digital society from which all stakeholders can benefit. Report commissioned by Huawei, 2013.

In many parts of the world, the so-called digital divide of today is an issue that goes beyond a gap in Internet access. It now encompasses access to higher broadband speeds and the willingness and ability to use them, or the degree of “useful usage” in the public and private sectors alike. The strategies for overcoming the digital divide vary among countries, both in terms of leadership, funding and technologies, and do not necessarily address underlying gaps, such as affordability, usage, and relevance of content.

FDA Regulation of Mobile Health, 2nd Edition



Mobile apps span a wide range of health functions. While many mobile apps carry minimal risk, those that can pose a greater risk to patients will require FDA review. This report analyses the September 2013 FDA publication of final guidance on mobile medical apps. Published by mobihealthnews, October 2013.

The widespread adoption and use of mobile technologies is opening new and innovative ways to improve health and health care delivery. The FDA encourages the development of mobile medical apps that improve health care and provide consumers and health care professionals with valuable health information.

Experience of Voters with Disabilities in the 2012 United States Election Cycle



This report examines the impact of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) of 2002 by documenting the experiences of American voters with disabilities during the 2012 general election cycle. Published by the National Council on Disability, October 2013.

This report provides a snapshot of architectural, attitudinal, technological, legislative, and voting practice barriers that confronted voters with disabilities in the 2012 general election cycle, and provides an overview of the use of federal funds, activities, and outcomes under HAVA for people with disabilities over the past decade.

Doubling Digital Opportunities: Enhancing the Inclusion of Women and Girls in the Information Society



This publication frames the challenges and opportunities we face in achieving gender equality in an era of rapid technological change. A report by the Broadband Commission Working Group on Broadband and Gender, published in September 2013.

It closely examines critical gender issues with respect to new information and communication technologies (ICTs) and broadband. Most important, it shows ways in which we can further advance the sustainable development agenda by promoting the use of new technologies in support of gender equality and women’s empowerment.
 
Related publication:
 
The ICT Opportunity for a Disability Inclusive Development Framework - Synthesis report of the ICT Consultation in support of the High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development of the 68th Session of the United Nations General Assembly | September 2013. Download Report.

From Exclusion to Equality: The Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a Handbook for Parliamentarians



This is a handbook for parliamentarians on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol. Published by the Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities - United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN-DESA) and Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), 2007

Parliaments and parliamentarians have a key role to play in promoting and protecting human rights. This Handbook aims to assist parliamentarians and others in efforts to realize the Convention so that persons with disabilities can achieve the transition from exclusion to equality. The Handbook seeks to raise awareness of the Convention and its provisions, promote an appreciation of disability concerns, and assist parliaments in understanding the mechanisms and frameworks needed to translate the Convention into practice.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework



Synthesis report of the ICT Consultation in support of the High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development of the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly | September 2013

In today’s world, with the ubiquitous impact of ICTs across all sectors of activities in all countries, no one should be excluded from using mobile phones, the Internet, televisions, computers, electronic kiosks and their myriad of applications and services including in education, political life, and cultural activities or for e-government or e-health. The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework contributes to a better understanding of the extent to which information and communication technologies (ICTs) enable and accelerate the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities. It highlights that when ICTs are available, affordable and accessible, they significantly improve access to all aspects of society and development.

UN Broadband Commission Report: The State of Broadband 2013: Universalizing Broadband



Mobile broadband is the fastest growing technology in human history, according to the 2013 edition of the State of Broadband report. Published by the UN Broadband Commission, September 2013

Released in New York at the 8th meeting of the Broadband Commission for Digital Development, the report reveals that mobile broadband subscriptions, which allow users to access the web via smartphones, tablets and WiFi-connected laptops, are growing at a rate of 30% per year. By the end of 2013 there will be more than three times as many mobile broadband connections as there are conventional fixed broadband subscriptions.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion



Successful businesses recognize that incorporating disability in all diversity and inclusion practices positively impacts their companies’ bottom line. Corporate CEOs understand that it’s cost effective to recruit and retain the best talent regardless of disability. Published by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 2013.

As a collaborative initiative to share creative inclusion practices that succeed, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited congressional and business leaders to participate in the second Corporate Disability
Employment Summit: Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion. Prior to the summit, business leaders were asked to share their successful disability inclusion strategies. This publication highlights these strategies, which businesses of all sizes can use to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain.

Comreg: Electronic Communications: Proposed Measures to Ensure Equivalence in Access and Choice for Disabled End-Users



ComReg proposes various measures in respect of accessible information and services for consultation on ensuring equivalence in access and choice for disabled end-users. Published by the Commission for Communications Regulation, June 20, 2013

The European Commission (“EC”), in its 2007 review, proposed revisions to the European regulatory framework for electronic communications sector to include enhanced consumer protection measures, in particular, ‘improved accessibility for users with disabilities’. ComReg is interested to hear the views of interested parties in relation to the proposals in this consultation document.

Putting e-Accessibility at the Core of Information Systems



This white paper follows discussions from the 6th European e-Accessibility Forum organized by the Association BrailleNet and Universcience in Paris, France, on March 26, 2012. This is a Business Case White Paper Series published by G3ict in March 2013.

This G3ict White Paper presents and discusses
• The notion that e-accessibility must no longer be approached as an afterthought but rather as a core component of information systems with the potential to increase business and performance;
• The importance of widely recognized standards and technical guidance;
• The need for industry leaders to rise to the challenge and provide all stakeholders, from designers to end users, with the necessary tools and training to make e-accessibility feasible in large organizations;
• The means to design, build and distribute accessible products and services; and
• The importance of implementing accessibility in the day-to-day activities of digital content and service providers.
 
Available in Russian: Download PDF.  
 

OHCHR Report 2012: United Nations Human Rights Annual Report



In 2013, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) celebrates 20 years of existence. Searching for lasting solutions to human rights challenges forms part of the human rights mechanisms’ role. Published by OHCHR 2013

In 2012, we observed growing emphasis on human rights within the international discourse on peace and security and development. At the inational level, progress was achieved through new laws and improved institutional frameworks in numerous countries. Throughout the world, a collective consciousness on human rights, in many ways spurred by the Arab Spring, continued to gain momentum.

UNICEF The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities



Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities – as the personal essays in this volume attest. Published by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) May 2013

Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), governments around the world have taken upon themselves the responsibility of ensuring that all children, irrespective of ability or disability, enjoy their rights without discrimination of any kind.

NTIA Broadband Adoption Toolkit 2013



Nearly one-third of Americans do not have broadband at home—that’s more than 100 million people without access to high-speed Internet. Whether they lack the skills or the income to become broadband users, these citizens are isolated from the digital mainstream. This toolkit will aid organizations and government agencies to reach, educate, and support people who are not yet online. Published by Broadband USA in May 2013

This Broadband Adoption Toolkit draws on the experiences of the recipients of grants from the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP). To date, the efforts of BTOP grant recipients have added hundreds of thousands of new broadband subscribers and, in the process, have yielded invaluable lessons on how to serve “hard-to-reach” Americans effectively. It is the hope of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) that this Toolkit will help other agencies and organizations around the country to accelerate efforts to help the nearly one-third of Americans who are not broadband subscribers in their journey toward full inclusion in the online universe of education, employment, healthcare, and other vital activities.

A New Financial Access Frontier - People with Disabilities



This paper explores how microfinance institutions and disability organizations can best contribute to increasing access to financial services for poor people with disabilities worldwide. Author: Josh Goldstein | Published 2010

After a brief discussion of the challenge and the opportunity, the concept paper advances several working hypotheses about steps the microfinance industry could take. This concept paper was the basis of a roundtable held on June 18, 2010 in Washington D.C. and the ideas presented within were the key areas of discussion.

The World in 2013: ITU's ICT Facts and Figures



The latest ICT Facts and Figures which show continued and almost universal growth in ICT uptake. Every day we are moving closer to having almost as many mobile- cellular subscriptions as people on earth. The mobile revolution is m-powering people in developing countries by delivering ICT applications in education, health, government, banking, environment and business.

In 2013, there are almost as many mobile-cellular subscriptions as people in the world, with more than half in the Asia-Pacific region (3.5 billion out of 6.8 billion total subscriptions). As global mobile-cellular penetration approaches 100% and market saturation is reached, growth rates have fallen to their lowest levels in both developed and developing countries. Mobile-cellular penetration rates stand at 96% globally; 128% in developed countries; and 89% in developing countries.

Toward the Full Inclusion of People with Disabilities: Examining the Accessibility of Overseas Facilities and Programs Funded by the United States



The overarching aim of this report is to advance understanding and to promote accessibility and inclusion of people with disabilities in foreign assistance programs funded by the United States. Published by the National Council on Disability, 2013

The report reviews U.S. federal disability laws, the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Disability Policy, and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and discusses their application to U.S. foreign assistance programs. The report examines the work of USAID, the U.S. Department of State (DOS), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and provides recommendations that will strengthen the operation of these agencies by ensuring U.S. Government funding is used in a manner that is accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities.

UNESCO Global Report: Opening New Avenues for Empowerment - ICTs to Access Information and Knowledge for Persons with Disabiltiies



Building on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Global Report addresses strong recommendations to all stakeholders – from decision-makers to educators, civil society and industry – on how concretely to advance the rights of people living with disabilities. These recommendations draw on extensive research and consultations. Studies launched in five regions have allowed UNESCO to understand more clearly the conditions and challenges faced by persons with disabilities around the world. UNESCO Report published in February 2013

The overall aims of this report are:
  • To provide governments, civil society, industry, academia and other groups with an insight into the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) by persons with disabilities to access information and knowledge around the world;
  • To present an overview and critical assessment of existing information policies and strategies as well as challenges and advantages in using ICTs to access information and knowledge for persons with disabilities;
  • To identify practices at local, national and global levels on effective application of ICTs by persons with disabilities to access information and knowledge;
  • To foster future frameworks on the use of ICTs to access information and knowledge of persons with disabilities (PWD); and
  • Based on the best available information and analysis, to make recommendations for strategy formulation, action-oriented initiatives and new synergies at national, regional and international levels.

Vodafone Public Policy Research: Making Broadband Accessible for All



This report looks at the conditions for growth in access to data services and the internet. It considers the potential for extending access beyond affluent urban users to the wider population and contains key findings for network service providers, data service businesses, governments and regulators. Vodafone Public Policy Research, May 2011.

As in developed markets, broadband strategies in emerging markets have tended to focus on investment in fibre. However, this focus on fibre may miss an opportunity for a quicker and more cost-effective transformational change built on the capabilities and in particular accessibility of mobile broadband. The early evidence suggests that mobile internet is spreading is quickly, in some emerging markets, as mobile telephony did originally. Mobile broadband use is already more extensive than realised by policymakers. By contrast, fixed internet access is stagnant.

The PASSAGE Project: Making European Rail Travel Accessible for All



A passenger with a disability or reduced mobility (PRM) is entitled to access trains and stations under the same conditions as other passengers, unless the design of the train or station makes the access physically impossible. Report prepared by Dirk Oelschlager and David Sindall and presented at TRANSED 2012, New Delhi, India

The European Commission is making accessibility an essential requirement for rail infrastructure when newly built, upgraded or renewed. Accessibility can be achieved by preventing or removing barriers and through other measures such as provision of assistance. The rules apply to infrastructure (e.g. obstacle-free routes, ticketing, information desks, toilets, visual and spoken information, platform width and height, and boarding aids) and to rail carriages (e.g. doors, toilets, wheelchair spaces, and information).

Accessibility Design Guide: Universal Design Principles for Australia's Aid Program



This guide is a rich resource of ideas which development practitioners can consider when applying universal design. The aim is to support Australia’s aid program so it minimizes barriers and becomes more accessible. Published by the Australian Government - AusAID as a companion volume to Development for All: Towards a disability-inclusive Australian aid program 2009–2014

This Accessibility Design Guide supports Australia’s own commitment to people with disability and supports its international obligations. It has been developed to support the many players involved in designing, appraising, implementing, monitoring or otherwise managing Australian aid activities funded through the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID).

BBC Media Action: Health on the Move - Can Mobile Phones Save Lives?



This policy briefing draws on BBC Media Action’s direct experience in using mobile phones to improve health education in one of the poorest states of India. Published by BBC Media Action, February 2013

This policy briefing focuses on how one of the greatest engines of innovation in the 21st century – the mobile phone – offers important opportunities for saving lives. The explosive growth of mobile telephony over the past decade has generated exciting new thinking around its potential to improve the uptake of health services and healthy behaviours. That potential is increasingly being
transformed into practice, with encouraging results.

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities (Accessibilité de la téléphonie et des services mobiles pour les personnes handicapées)



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

Active Ageing Index 2012 for 27 EU Member States



The Active Ageing Index (AAI) is a newly developed tool that offers national and European policy-makers a way to measure and promote the untapped potential of the older population. In its design, the index follows the conceptual framework of the 2012 European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations | Published by the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna | December 2012

The index measures the active ageing performance across four distinct domains that together capture the untapped potential of older people across EU Member States:
1. Employment of older workers;
2. Social activity and participation of older people;
3. Independent and autonomous living of older persons; and
4. Capacity and enabling environment for active ageing.

Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific



The Incheon Strategy provides the Asian and Pacific region, and the world, with the first set of regionally agreed disability-inclusive development goals. It builds on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and will enable the Asian and Pacific region to track progress towards improving the quality of life, and the fulfilment of the rights, of the region’s 650 million persons with disabilities. Published by United Nations ESCAP, 2012.

Similar to the Millennium Development Goals, the Incheon goals and targets are time-bound for accelerating implementation by focusing particular attention on the achievement of a set of priority goals and targets during the course of the new Decade, 2013–2022, as well as facilitating the measurement of progress to be attained by countries and territories in the Asia-Pacific region.
 
Also see: CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report, 2nd Edition, published by G3ict and Disabled Peoples' International 

Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Accessibility of Public Sector Bodies' Websites



This explanatory memorandum presents in further detail the proposal for a new Directive aiming at the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States on the accessibility of websites from public sector bodies | Published by the European Commission on December 3, 2012

Web-accessibility refers to principles and techniques to be obeserved when constructing websites, in order to render the content of these websites accessible to all users, in particular those with disabilities. Web-accessibility is of great importance for public sector bodies, to extend their reach and to fulfil their public responsibilities. Harmonization will lead to better market conditions, more jobs, cheaper web-accessibility and more accessible websites: a triple win for governments, businesses, and citizens.

Better Design and Buildings for Everyone: Disabled People’s Rights and the Built Environment



The ability to move through the world independently and safely allows disabled people access to and the ability to participate in communities, education, health services, recreation, and make social connections. Access to the built environment is therefore a fundamental human right | Published by New Zealand's Human Rights Commission October 2012

This report covers buildings in particular and looks at:
1. the Commission’s experience in accessibility issues relating to the built environment
2. the relevant international standards and domestic legislation
3. overseas approaches to the issue
4. ideas to improve accessibility in the future.

Between Markets and Mandates: Approaches to Promoting Broadband Access for Persons with Disabilities



For a person with a disability, the impact of broadband can be truly life-altering. It can empower social networking, mentoring, and connecting with the broader world. It expands access to information, resources, and tools to meet complex needs in emergencies and disasters. It may even provide an opportunity for employment. All of which makes this report. Between Markets and Mandates: Approaches to Promoting Broadband Access for Persons with Disabilities, by Krishna Jayakar of the Pennsylvania State University, so timely and valuable | Published by Time Warner Cable 'Research Program on Digital Communications'

This report examines access to broadband by individuals with disabilities in order to identify programs and policies that promote broadband adoption. It begins by identifying significant barriers that prevent persons with disabilities from accessing broadband, including availability in their locations of residence, affordability, and device and content accessibility.

Making Voting More Accessible for Veterans with Disabilities



All citizens, with or without disability, should be assured they are able to vote privately, securely and independently. Compared to people without disabilities, people with disabilities are more likely to report having a voter registration problem, experiencing difficulty with voting equipment, and needing help to vote. Published by Information Technology and Innovation Foundation | July 24, 2012

In 2010, the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), in partnership with the Georgia Tech Research Institute and the Operation BRAVO Foundation, received a grant from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) to determine the voting needs of recently injured military personnel and recommend practical and efficient ways to improve voting technologies and election administration practices to assist them in voting. Shortly thereafter, the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP in the Department of Defense initiated a series of studies to assess voter registration and absentee voting problems among recently injured active duty personnel.

GSDRC: Economic Benefits of Disability-Inclusive Development



A disability-inclusive approach to development seeks to include people with disability in the development process by "recognizing their potential, valuing and respecting their contributions and perspectives, honoring their dignity, and effectively responding to their needs" | Published by Governance and Social Development Resource Center | September 2012 | Author: Oliver Walton

The economic benefits of adopting a disability-inclusive approach to development are widely acknowledged in the literature as being significant. The literature also recognises, however, that these benefits are complex and difficult to quantify. This report provides an overview of the literature on the economic benefits of adopting a disability-inclusive approach to development. It also provides examples of good practice in the area of disability-inclusive development, with a particular focus on examples that demonstrate the economic benefits of adopting this approach.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

Equity for Women with Disabilities in India: National Commission for Women, India



This is a strategy paper prepared for the National Commission for Women, India. Disabled women in India face numerous challenges. In the absence of well coordinated government policies aimed at integrating disabled people in mainstream activities, disabled women live under extremely difficult conditions, for not only are they women but most of them are in the rural areas. The women with disabilities in India are discriminated against equality. Discrimination deprives disabled women of vital life experiences, and therefore by denying them the opportunity to participate fully in community affairs they are deprived of equality of opportunity | 2012

Around the world, women make up just over 51% of the population. Women with disabilities are the most marginalized in Indian society. They are deprived of political, Social, Economic, and health opportunities. The problems of women with disabilities become very complex with other factors such as social stigma and poverty.

CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report



A G3ict-DPI Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version (3.8 MB) | Second edition 2012

The CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report includes the latest data on 52 countries representing 77.4 percent of the World Population. The report offers disability advocates, governments, civil society and international organizations - monitoring the progress of the implementation of the Convention by States Parties - a unique benchmarking tool that collects data on country laws, policies, and programs pertaining to accessible and assistive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) around the globe.  All results are available cross-tabulated by region, level of income per capita of Human Development Index to facilitate benchmarking by advocates and policy makers.
 

Accessibility of Government Websites in India



This report summarizes the key findings of a test conducted to measure the accessibility of 7800 websites of the Government of India and its affiliated agencies against the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, which is the universally accepted standard for web accessibility. It uses a combination of automated and manual testing to derive key findings.

Website inaccessibility is the largest and most common barrier to implementing effective e-governance. In a country like India, where a very large percentage of the population is disabled, elderly, illiterate, rural, having limited bandwidth, speaks only a vernacular language or uses alternative platforms like mobile phones, having accessible websites becomes all the more important to ensure that government information and services which are available online are accessible and usable by these groups.

Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations



This book explores the fundamental factors that are shaping the use of the Web for social and economic development. It describes the contributors that shape how the Internet grows, and how the Web can be made available to and effective for those billions in need. It addresses issues currently restricting access to the Web — political, technological, economic, cultural and linguistic — and suggests what mechanisms can be brought to bear to accelerate its utilization for poor and under-served populations.

This is a book about both ICTs and the World Wide Web. While the Web is one application of many existing on top of the Internet, it is the application that provides the principal window through which users increasingly access ICTs and which is evolving to permeate many aspects of daily life. It therefore deserves significant attention for its potential in making further significant contributions to assisting poor and underserved individuals and communities throughout the world.
 
Also read: Web Accessibility Policy Making: An International Perspective (3rd Edition, 2012). Download report.

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

Broadband Adoption and Use in America



Broadband Adoption and Use in America: OBI Working Paper Series No. 1. The Federal Communications Commission’s October-November 2009 survey finds that nearly two-thirds (65%) of American adults use high-speed Internet connections to go online from home.

The FCC conducted a survey of 5,005 Americans in October and November 2009 in an effort to understand the state of
broadband adoption and use, as well as barriers facing those who do not have broadband at home. Some 42% of Americans with disabilities have broadband at home. Broadband users overwhelmingly view the social aspects of the Internet as very important to them, while watching TV, videos or movies online and playing games were deemed less important.
 
Related event: G3ict Global Inquiry Kick-off Workshop: Broadband Adoption by Persons with Disabilities
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

Disability Expectations: Investing in a Better Life, a Stronger Australia



The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) was put forward by the Productivity Commission in its report Disability Care and Support, which was submitted to government on 31 July 2011 and publicly released by the Prime Minister on 10 August 2011. The NDIS proposes a way forward for Australia.

PwC brought together an expert team with extensive experience in the disability support system. The aim of the group has been to answer the question “What is required to deliver the NDIS?” This paper provides a brief history of disability in Australia and, as part of its focus, draws on international experience and comparisons. Published by PwC | November 2011

Inclusion Made Easy: A Quick Program Guide to Disability in Development



It aims to give practical guidance on how to ensure people with a disability are included in international development programs. Statistical information, inclusion strategies and key questions are included within a human rights framework throughout this guide.

Inclusion Made Easy is designed for program staff in international development organisations. It is a brief, practical guide on how to ensure programs are disability-inclusive. It offers basic inclusion principles, practical tips and case study examples. Part A focuses on disability-inclusive development principles and Part B on disability inclusion across a range of development sectors.

Accessibility - A Guide for Businesses and Organizations by Microsoft



Accessible technology addresses the personal needs of all computer users, including those with physical disabilities, learning and language impairments, and age-related limitations, making it easier for organizations to empower employees, serve customers, and engage with partners | Published by Microsoft in 2011

This guide from Microsoft® provides information about accessibility and accessible technology to help organizations worldwide ensure that all the people they serve or engage have equal access to information and services. For organizations new to accessibility and working with people with disabilities, accessibility can sometimes seem overwhelming. To help your organization meet the needs of people with all types of abilities, this guide provides specific information about many types of impairments and some of the accessible technology solutions that help address them.

A Comparative Test of Web Accessibility Evaluation Methods



After a quick review and description of methods, the paper illustrates a comparative test of two web accessibility evaluation methods: conformance testing and barrier walk through | Giorgio Brajnik, Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Udine | October 2008

Accessibility auditors have to choose a method when evaluating accessibility: expert review (a.k.a. conformance testing),
user testing, subjective evaluations, barrier walkthrough are some possibilities. The comparison in this study aims at determining merits of barrier walkthrough, using conformance testing as a control condition. A comparison framework is outlined, followed by the description of a laboratory experiment with 12 subjects (novice accessibility evaluators), and its results.

ILO-Irish Aid Case Study on Ethiopia: Disability Inclusion through Effective Legislation and Policies



For nearly a decade, the ILO-Irish Aid Partnership Programme has been working with Ethiopia's Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MOLSA) to raise awareness of the need for review and reform of legislation and policy on disability and employment | ILO-Irish Aid | March 2012

Over the past four years in Ethiopia, several factors have played a pivotal role in intensifying the focus on disability and better understanding the barriers faced by disabled persons. At the international level, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which came into force in 2008 and was ratified by Ethiopia in 2010, stimulated much discussion on the implications of the new international human rights instrument and how it might be utilized to support disability-inclusive policies and practices. At the national level, the synergies and complementarities created by two recent instruments - "Right to Employment of Persons with Disability" and the Growth and Transformation Plan for 2011-2015 - provide a framework for more effective participation of disabled persons in Ethiopian society and embrace a disability perspective. Together, all three instruments help to strengthen and support legal protection, policymaking and inclusive planning for development.

Technological Innovations in Transportation for People with Disabilities



The report summarizes a workshop held on February 23, 2011 to examine technological innovations in accessible transportation and better understand the requirements of pedestrians and travelers with visual impairment or other disabilities | U.S. Department of Transportation | February 2011

To examine technological innovations in accessible transportation and better understand the requirements of pedestrians and travelers with visual impairment or other disabilities, the Federal Highway Administration’s Office of Research, Development, and Technology and, specifically, leaders from the Office of Operations Research and Development and the Exploratory Advanced Research Program, convened a 1-day workshop to explore this area. In February 2011, a panel of speakers made up of disability experts, academia professionals, transportation industry experts, and other professionals were brought together to discuss applications of technology, identify knowledge gaps and opportunities, and highlight barriers to implementation.

Through the distribution of this summary report to the workshop participants and the broader highway and disability communities, we aim to encourage further discussion regarding the development of technological applications for pedestrians and travelers with disabilities. These discussions could also lead to the identification of future research needs and opportunities to enhance the transportation accessibility for all Americans.

Caption Accuracy Metrics Project - Research into Automated Error Ranking of Real-time Captions in Live Television News Programs



Caption Accuracy Metrics Project report is produced by The Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media at WGBH (NCAM) | Authors: Tom Apone, Brad Botkin, Marcia Brooks and Larry Goldberg | September 2011

Real-time captioned news is a lifeline service for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, providing critical information about their local communities, national events and emergencies. The project scope was to: develop an industry standard approach to measuring caption quality, and use language-processing tools to create an automated caption accuracy assessment tool for real-time captions on live news programming.

International Impact of the United Nations Convention the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – A New Engine of Reform



This is a paper presented by Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre on Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2009 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium.

Excerpt: "To see a theory of justice embodied in a single instrument – in a single piece of law – lives one confidence in the possibility of seeking justice through law. That is precisely why the Americans with Disabilities Act lit a fire that spread rapidly throughout the world. And so it is with the new United National Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. I once wrote that while disability rights is an American invention, it is now truly a global challenge. I want to talk about why such a convention was deemed necessary. The real added‐value of the convention lies in its ability to trigger a new kind of disability politics worldwide. For without a new dynamic of change – one that can sustain itself – we will not see real change happening.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

Understanding Web Accessibility: A Guide to Create Accessible Work Environments



This handbook provides insights and tips on what a company needs to do for ICT accessibility and the potential benefits that thus accrue.

Web accessibility simply means that the web pages are usable by all and also on different devices. Web Accessibility Guidelines are popularly known as WCAG 2.0. The website www.w3.org/wai not only provides these guidelines, but also provides links to testing the websites and suggests changes that need to be made in order to make a website compliant to WCAG 2.0. Whenever, a new website or web-based user interface is created or updated, one must insist that the web developers make the site WCAG 2.0 compliant. Having this deliverable as part of the contract would help ensure execution of the task.
 
This publication is released by NASSCOM Foundation and has been made possible with the support of the Wadhwani Foundation.

Review of International Best Practices in Accessible Public Transportation for Persons with Disabilities



This United Nations Development Programme publication covers easy to long-term practices for improving access in transport. It discusses the elements of accessibility, road and pedestrian environments, vehicle design and operation, stops and stations, signage and information, and training and policies | Kementerian Pembangunan Wanita, Keluarga dan Masyarakat Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development

One of the articles of the Convention, which is also the subject of this report, is the core issue of accessibility. Article 9 of the Convention requires countries to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers and ensure that persons with disabilities can access their environment, transportation, public facilities and e-services, and information and communications technologies. More importantly, the Convention approaches issues of persons with disabilities from a rights-based approach. Hence, Article 9 also speaks about the importance of enabling persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life, which will not be possible, if accessibility is not fully ensured.
 
This report provides an international overview of the key technical issues on accessible public transportation for persons with disabilities. It begins with a brief description of the prevalence of disability and factors that influence accessibility. It also explains why safe and convenient pedestrian infrastructure is particularly essential for persons with disabilities if they wish to satisfactorily access public transport.

A Community for All: Implementing Article 19



A Guide for Monitoring Progress on the Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This guide and checklist were developed as part of a project of the Mental Health Initiative and the Law and Health Initiative of the Open Society Public Health Program | Open Society Foundations, December 2012

The Community for All guide and checklist offers a detailed look at the rights identified in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), especially Article 19 of the CRPD which provides for the right to live independently and be included in the community. The guide and checklist are intended to help advocates and program implementers identify the obligations on States to realize these rights. Community for All promotes the right of all people with disabilities to live and participate in the community as equal citizens, particularly in countries in which people with disabilities continue to be segregated in institutions.

Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities



Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities | A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices by The Centre for Internet & Society, India and G3ict | December 2011

Universal Service definitions have been developed by 125 countries and are the foundation for policies and programs ensuring that telecommunications are available to all categories of population. Universal service funds are the main vehicle used to fund those programs, primarily addressing imbalances such as lack of availability of services in rural areas. While geographic coverage has vastly improved over the past decade with wireless infrastructure, the scope of Universal Service has expanded to include other categories of underserved populations.
 
This report aims to serve as a useful reference for policy makers, operators, organizations of persons with disabilities, and as a framework for good practice sharing among countries currently implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
 

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

Accessible Content: Best Practices Guide for Digital Environments



Video description should offer equivalent access to film, television and online content in multi-platform environments for people who are blind or have low vision. Publication by Analysis and Research in Communications, ARC and Media Access Canada.

The purpose of video description is to support and reflect the entertainment qualities of the content through description of the visual stimuli and style conveyed. 
 
Visual elements that are often overlooked by describers include title and end credits, subtitles and captions. Commercials and online content that stand alone or serve to support a program should also be described. Visual elements necessary to understand and enjoy the entertainment experience are described in this publication. 

Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion



Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies | September 2011

While businesses sometimes encounter serious challenges as they seek to implement inclusion strategies, many employers have overcome these hurdles with robust and creative practices. Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies. This publication highlights successful strategies that can be used by businesses of all sizes to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. Real-life examples, such as these, are important to help businesses realize the wide range of opportunities available and the potential for replicating success.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

Implementation of Convention of Rights of Persons with Disability - Role of the UN and Other International Organizations



In this presentation initially developed for the Dynamic Coalition on Disability and Development of the Internet Governance Forum, Peter Major, Special Adviser, Permanent Mission of Hungary to the United Nations in Geneva, reviews the institutional bodies, initiatives and programs currently involved in supporting the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities among United Nations affiliates and related international organizations. A clear, concise and useful roadmap for all involved in international cooperation in matters of disability rights.


Shifting Perspectives: Opening Up Museums and Galleries to Blind and Partially Sighted People



Shifting Perspectives: Opening up museums and galleries to blind and partially sighted people, a research initiative of CultureLink, supported by RNIB (2011)

The museum experience of disabled people is beginning to be talked of as a human and cultural right. Indeed, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by the UK in 2009, recognises the right of disabled people to take part in culture “on equal terms”. This is a major shift.

Shifting Perspectives, seeing disabled people as part of the design solution and not the problem, will renew museums. This user-focused report gives a step-by-step approach to making cultural institutions accessible to the blind and partially sighted people.

The Role of High-Speed Broadband in Telecommunications Between People with Limited Speech and the Health Workforce



Report for the Institute for a Broadband-Enabled Society, University of Melbourne, Australia, detailing the role of high speed broadband in communication between people with little or no speech and GPs. Year: 2010/2011

In April 2009, the federal government announced that it will be launching a National Broadband Network, with Internet speeds up to 100 times faster than current speeds in Australia. Evidence has shown that internet-based solutions enable people with communication impairments to make themselves heard and to interact with others.

This research sought to address the communication needs of people with little or no speech in healthcare, and began to explore the potential role of high-speed broadband in facilitating communication between GPs and patients with communication difficulties. 

FCC-EAAC Report on Emergency Calling for Persons with Disabilities, 2011



This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010

This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission), contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA), signed into law by President Obama on 8 October 2010.

The CVAA requires the Commission to take various steps to ensure that people with disabilities have access to emerging communications technologies in the 21st century. The Commission established the EAAC in accordance with the CVAA, which directs that an advisory committee be established within 60 days after the date of enactment, for the purpose of achieving equal access to emergency services by individuals with disabilities as part of our nation’s migration to a national Internet protocol-enabled emergency network, also known as the next generation 9-1-1 system.

WHO-World Bank "World Report on Disability"



More than one billion people face some form of disability, says a UN report developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank.

The World Report on Disability, developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank, with contributions from over 380 experts, urges governments to “to step up efforts to enable access to mainstream services and to invest in specialized programmes to unlock the vast potential of people with disabilities.”

“Disability is part of the human condition,” said WHO Director-General Margaret Chan at a ceremony in UN headquarters to launch the report. “Almost every one of us will be permanently or temporarily disabled at some point in life.”

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

Text Version - CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility 2010



A G3ict Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Text Version | 2010

The CRPD Progress Report on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) accessibility is a unique benchmarking tool that identifies the degree to which each of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on ICTs and Assistive Technologies (ATs) is actually enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impact. It includes data points relative to the status of ICT accessibility and ATs availability among ratifying countries. Data collected measure:

# State Party CRPD legal and programmatic commitments
#
State Party capacity for implementation
# Assessment of the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities

Download the text version. You can also download the PDF version here.

PDF version - CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility 2010



A G3ict Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version | 2010

2012-09-13 The CRPD Progress Report on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) accessibility is a unique benchmarking tool that identifies the degree to which each of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on ICTs and Assistive Technologies (ATs) is actually enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impact. It includes data points relative to the status of ICT accessibility and ATs availability among ratifying countries. Data collected measure:

# State Party CRPD legal and programmatic commitments
#
State Party capacity for implementation
# Assessment of the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities

Download the PDF version. You can also download the Text version here.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

EU - Proposal for a Council Decision concerning the conclusion, by the European Community, of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol were adopted on 13 December 2006 by the United Nations General Assembly. On the basis of negotiating directives adopted by the Council on 24 May 2004, the Commission conducted the negotiation of the Convention on behalf of the European Community. The Council Decision dated 27 March 2007 (ST07404/07) authorized the Community to sign the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Commission signed the Convention on 30 March 2007. On 3 May 2008, the Convention and its Optional Protocol entered into force. Since the Optional Protocol has not yet been signed, its accession should be proposed. Two proposals, one for concluding the Convention, the other for acceding to the Optional Protocol, are therefore required.

EU - Proposal for a Council Decision Concerning the Conclusion, by the European Community, of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol were adopted on 13 December 2006 by the United Nations General Assembly. On the basis of negotiating directives adopted by the Council on 24 May 2004, the Commission conducted the negotiation of the Convention on behalf of the European Community. The Council Decision authorized the Community to conclude the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. On 3 May 2008, the Convention and its Optional Protocol entered into force. Since the Optional Protocol has not yet been signed, its accession should be proposed.

EU - Proposal for a Council Directive on Implementing the Principle of Equal Treatment



The aim of this proposal is to implement the principle of equal treatment between persons irrespective of religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation outside the labor market. It sets out a framework for the prohibition of discrimination on these grounds and establishes a uniform minimum level of protection within the European Union for people who have suffered such discrimination. This proposal supplements the existing EC legal framework under which the prohibition of discrimination on grounds of religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation applies only to employment, occupation and vocational training.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, October 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this October 2008 issue focuses on a key piece of legislation, the Broadband Data Improvement Act that was signed into law this past month. The Act seeks to improve broadband deployment throughout the nation, especially in underserved areas by advancing federal data collection efforts to inform subsequent legislation and regulatory rulemakings. In addition, the law has the aim of enhancing economic development, furthering public safety in communities, improving health care and educational opportunities, and providing a better quality of life for all Americans through more comprehensive deployment of broadband services.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, September 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this September 2008 issue focuses on legislative activity addressing emerging technologies and accessibility by persons with disabilities.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, July/August 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this July/August 2008 issue focuses on legislative activity addressing emerging technologies and accessibility by persons with disabilities.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, April 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this April 2008 issue focuses on how reducing wireless accessibility barriers has been a recurring theme in recent legislation in the U.S. Congress.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, March 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this March 2008 issue focuses on regulators at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and how the Commission raised a total of $19.592 billion in its auction of 700MHz airwaves that concluded March 19, 2008. Read below for more information on RERC Efforts in the AT&T Press Release:

RERC Efforts Acknowledged in AT&T Press Release

03.13.2008 - In an effort to encourage application developers and handset manufacturers to consider the needs of seniors or customers who have disabilities when designing products and services, AT&T Inc. announced through a press release that the company's approach to Universal Design will be made publicly available for the first time. AT&T embraces the concept of Universal Design and has urged its handset and software partners to consider this methodology as they develop wireless products and applications. AT&T's recently launched Mobile Speak and Mobile Magnifier applications are examples of accessible products and services that result from innovative collaboration and design.

In creating its Universal Design methodology, AT&T consulted with many leading experts, such as the Wireless RERC. By making AT&T's Universal Design methodology available on its website, the company is hoping all developers of wireless products and applications will consider how future designs can create accessible products, like Mobile Magnifier and Mobile Speak. "Integration of Universal Design into business practice is fundamental to our mission of equitable access to wireless technologies for people of all ages and abilities," said Jim Mueller, project director, User-Centered Research, Wireless RERC. "We're glad that AT&T shares our commitment and is making its Universal Design methodology publicly available."
AT&T's document on Universal Design

[http://developer.att.com/universaldesign].

AT&T's resources for people with disabilities [http://www.wireless.att.com/about/disability-resources/disability-resources.jsp]

[Source: AT&T]

Assessment of the Status of eAccessibility in Europe



This Executive Summary of Measuring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe (MeAC) is a report from a study commissioned by the European Commission in 2006 as a follow up to the eAccessibility Communication of 2005. The basic aim was the provide an evidence base to support the future deveopment of EU policy in the eAccessibility field.

Web Accessibility in Context, an Investigation into Standardisation Issues



This study has set out to investigate the apparent gap between current published guidelines on accessibility and the current practice of web developers, and the tools used by the developers to create accessible websites.

Finding the Gaps: A Comparative Analysis of Disability Laws in the United States to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)



"Finding the Gaps: A Comparative Analysis of Disability Laws in the United States to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities" was written by John Vaughn, the Chairperson of the National Council on Disability. The purpose of this paper is to help the NCD, and others, better understand how the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, if ratified by the United States, might impact U.S. disability laws by examining the degree to which U.S. law is consistent with the CRPD. The paper endeavors to analyze the issue in the way a treaty monitoring body would - to see if any area within federal law contravenes the Convention and/or whether there are gaps where legislation or practice might be introduced or reformed to ensure compliance.

Making a Difference: A Quarterly Magazine of the Georgia Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities



This Spring 2008 issue of "Making a Difference" features a wide range of articles including one about the 10th Annual Disability Day where over 2,000 people came to hear Ambassador Luis Gallegos, G3ict Chair, speak on the steps of the Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia. Also featured towards the end of the publication is "Creating an Accessible World with the United Nations Convention," an article written by G3ict Executive Director Axel Leblois.

To read about the 10th Annual Disability Day with Ambassador Gallegos, please turn to page 12-15.

To read Axel Leblois' article on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, please turn to page 24.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

European e-Inclusion Initiative: First Contributions to the Campaign (Lisbon, 3 December 2007)



The European Commission's first publication on its European e-Inclusion Initiative.

European Commission's First Communication on the European e-Inclusion Initiative



European Commission's first communication on its European e-Inclusion Initiative.

NPR's Accessible Digital Radio Project



NPR's Accessible Digital Radio Project PowerPoint presentation.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.