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Publications & Reports

Making Your Organisation's Information Accessible for All: Implementing the Guidelines for Accessible Information



Accessible information is understood as information provided in formats that allow every user and learner to access content ‘on an equal basis with others’ (Article 9, United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – UNCRPD). Published by the the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education in 2015.

This guide has been produced for organisations that wish to provide accessible information both in the education sector and more widely. It should be used in conjunction with the Guidelines for Accessible Information (the Guidelines) and is one of the outcomes of the ICT for Information Accessibility in Learning (ICT4IAL) project. Editor: Marcella Turner-Cmuchal, European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.

United Nations ESCAP Report on Disability at a Glance 2015: Strengthening the Employment Prospects for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific



Disability at a Glance 2015 focuses on barriers to the employment of persons with disabilities in the Asia-Pacific region, and offers solutions to strengthen their employment prospects. Published by United Nations ESCAP in 2016.

Employment is not only the primary means of livelihood generation; it also provides individuals with the purpose and meaning of playing a productive role in society. Equal access to employment is therefore vital, and barriers to work faced by persons with disabilities must be removed. This fifth edition in the Disability at a Glance series offers a regional overview of disability legislation, policies and practices, as well as relevant country-specific information. The information draws on both a targeted disability survey carried out by the ESCAP secretariat, and research undertaken by other organizations and scholars.

Informe Sobre un Modelo: De Politica de Las TIC en Materia de Accesibilidad (Spanish)



This report is designed as a tool for national policy-makers and regulators to create their own ICT accessibility policy frameworks. The report was prepared in cooperation with G3ict under the supervision of the ITU Telecommunication Development Bureau (BDT) Special Initiatives Division | Spanish version published in November 2014.

El presente Informe de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones ha sido preparado en cooperación con G3ict, la Iniciativa mundial para tecnologías de la información y la comunicación inclusivas, con la supervisión de la División de Iniciativas Especiales de la Oficina de Desarrollo de las Telecomunicaciones de a UIT.
 
The report includes six modules focusing on different aspects of ICT accessibility (amendments to the existing ICT legal framework, public ICT access, mobile communications, television/video programming and public procurement of accessible ICTs) so that countries can prioritize implementation. In all modules the approach is to develop national policies in consultation with persons with disabilities. Lead Authors: ITU expert Mandla Msimang was the lead author of this report, with contributions of Axel Leblois, Founder and Executive Director of G3ict and Susan Schorr, Head, Special Initiatives Division, ITU. G3ict experts Dónal Rice and Clas Thorén authored the model accessible ICT public procurement policy framework module.  
 

The Internet of Things: Understanding the Issues and Challenges of a More Connected World



The Internet of Things promises to offer a revolutionary, fully connected “smart” world as the relationships between objects, their environment, and people become more tightly intertwined. Yet the issues and challenges associated with IoT need to be considered and addressed in order for the potential benefits for individuals, society, and the economy to be realized.

This overview document is designed to help the Internet Society community navigate the dialogue surrounding the Internet of Things in light of the competing predictions about its promises and perils. Five key IoT issue areas are examined to explore some of the most pressing challenges and questions related to the technology. These include security; privacy; interoperability and standards; legal, regulatory, and rights; and emerging economies and development. Published by the Internet Society in October 2015.
 

 

Rise of the Real-Time Traveler: An exploration of trends and innovation in urban mobility



Rise of the Real-Time Traveler starts by exploring developments such as changing demographics, urbanization and the continuing integration of technology in our daily lives. The report shines a light on how these shifts impact travelers, from ride-sharing and trip planning to automotive design. Published under the 'Its America Series' by AT&T in September 2015.

Connected consumers, connected cars, and the platforms that power them mean individual travelers have new levels of transportation choice, greater insight into the real-time benefits and costs associated with these choices, and an enhanced engagement with their decision making that can provide new levers for improving individual outcomes and overall system performance. This paper looks behind the headlines to understand what is driving this new era in transportation and how it is unfolding.

GAATES Toolkit: Key Indicators of Accessibility - Reporting on the UN CRPD



“This report was initiated and funded by The Delta Centre at the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs”. The objective of the report was to develop a toolkit that identifies key indicators on Universal Design and Accessibility in a national and international context. Published by GAATES in June 2015.

The toolkit serves to inform States Parties and is a model for signatories to the UNCRPD. Additionally, it fosters a higher level of understanding of accessibility and universal design around the world. The toolkit identifies a set of indicators that may be relevant when the signatories compile their reports to the UN on development in the area of universal design, in accordance with their obligations to UNCRPD, especially Article 9 on Accessibility. It provides an overview of accessibility/universal design indicators and measures that have been reported on by signatories to the CRPD.

The State of Broadband 2015: Broadband as a Foundation for Sustainable Development



This report explores what constitutes an effective National Broadband Plan to boost the deployment of broadband and maximize its impact as a cross-sectoral driver underpinning progress. Published by the Broadband Commission for Digital Development in September 2015.

Countries need to adopt effective policies and strategies to make broadband available, affordable and accessible, as a vital enabler of sustainable development in modern-day knowledge societies.

UNWTO's Manual on Accessible Tourism for All



The Manual on Accessible Tourism for All: Public-Private Alliances and Good Practices is the first publication of a technical nature produced by the UNWTO in collaboration with the ACS Foundation.

The Manual highlights the value of accessible heritage and cultural resources and provides the necessary technical knowledge for making built and natural tourism environments accessible within the framework of public-private alliances. The extensive experience of the ACS Foundation in these areas has served to stimulate the development of activities and products that make it possible to turn universal access in tourism into reality. The most significant actions are featured in this publication and represent best practices that can inspire other actors that may wish to adapt them to their respective realities.

Model ICT Accessibility Policy Report



This report is designed as a tool for national policy-makers and regulators to create their own ICT accessibility policy frameworks. The report was prepared in cooperation with G3ict under the supervision of the ITU Telecommunication Development Bureau (BDT) Special Initiatives Division | Published in November 2014. Accessibility of PDF report checked and edited by BarrierBreak (www.barrierbreak.com).

The report includes six modules focusing on different aspects of ICT accessibility (amendments to the existing ICT legal framework, public ICT access, mobile communications, television/video programming and public procurement of accessible ICTs) so that countries can prioritize implementation. In all modules the approach is to develop national policies in consultation with persons with disabilities. Lead Authors: ITU expert Mandla Msimang was the lead author of this report, with contributions of Axel Leblois, Founder and Executive Director of G3ict and Susan Schorr, Head, Special Initiatives Division, ITU. G3ict experts Dónal Rice and Clas Thorén authored the model accessible ICT public procurement policy framework module.  
 
» View Spanish version of the report.
» View French version of the report.
» View Arabic version of the report.
» View Chinese version of the report.
» View Russian version of the report.
 

Model Policy for Inclusive ICTs in Education for Persons with Disabilities



The publication has been drafted by Amanda Watkins of the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (www.european-agency.org) with the technical support of Axel Leblois of G3ict, on previous work from UNESCO and G3ict, as well as information collected during the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) +10 Review Event, February 2013, in particular the working group meetings “Towards WSIS+10 and Beyond: Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Knowledge Societies”, cohosted by UNESCO and G3ict.

This document presents a Model Policy for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Education for Persons with Disabilities. The focus is upon the use of ICTs to support the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD, 2006), specifically:
  • Article 9: Accessibility;
  • Article 21: Freedom of Expression and Opinion, and Access to Information;
  • Article 24: Inclusive Education.

Accessibility Requirements Suitable for Public Procurement of ICT Products and Services in Europe



This new standard (EN 301 549) is the first European Standard for accessible ICT. It is intended in particular for use by public authorities and other public sector bodies during procurement, to ensure that websites, software, digital devices are more accessible – so they may be used by persons with a wide range of abilities.

The new European Standard and its accompanying Technical Reports provide a framework for developing a wide range of applications that will make ICT products and services more accessible for the 80 million Europeans who are living with various types of disability. Potential applications include audio and/or tactile interfaces that can be used by visually impaired persons, or hardware such as smartphones and laptops that can be operated using one hand. Users of the present document should be aware that the document may be subject to revision or change of status. Information on the current status of this and other ETSI documents is available at http://www.etsi.org/technologies-clusters/technologies/human-factors?tab=2.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Report of the Expert Group Meeting on “E-Participation: Empowering People through Information Communication Technologies (ICTs)”



The outcomes of the meeting are intended to provide important inputs to the work of the Commission for Social Development, in particular demonstrating the impact of ICTs and e-Participation on people's empowerment and how they can be used as a means to implement the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. Published in 2013.

The Division for Social Policy and Development (DSPD) of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA), in collaboration with the Division for Public Administration and Development Management (DPADM) and the International
Telecommunication Union (ITU), organized an Expert Group Meeting on “E-Participation: Empowering People through Information Communication Technologies (ICTs)" from July 24-25 at ITU Headquarters in Geneva, as part of the preparations for the 52nd session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD) that will take place in February 2014 and to promote the 2013 theme of the Economic and Social Council Annual Ministerial Review on Science, technology and innovation - as well as culture - for sustainable development".

Putting e-Accessibility at the Core of Information Systems: Russian Version



This white paper follows discussions from the 6th European e-Accessibility Forum organized by the Association BrailleNet and Universcience in Paris, France, on March 26, 2012. This is a Business Case White Paper Series published by G3ict in March 2013. The Russian translation is courtesy UNIC Moscow.

This G3ict White Paper presents and discusses
• The notion that e-accessibility must no longer be approached as an afterthought but rather as a core component of information systems with the potential to increase business and performance;
• The importance of widely recognized standards and technical guidance;
• The need for industry leaders to rise to the challenge and provide all stakeholders, from designers to end users, with the necessary tools and training to make e-accessibility feasible in large organizations;
• The means to design, build and distribute accessible products and services; and
• The importance of implementing accessibility in the day-to-day activities of digital content and service providers.

Guidance Note on Disability and Emergency Risk Management for Health



An estimated 15% of the world’s population live with some form of disability, yet they are among the most vulnerable and neglected in any type of emergency. Published by the World Health Organization, 2013

This guidance note is intended primarily for health actors working in emergency and disaster risk management at the local, national
or international level, and in governmental or nongovernmental agencies. People with disabilities, those working in the disability sector and those working in other sectors that contribute to improved health outcomes related to emergency risk management, may also find this guidance note useful. It is a short, practical guide that covers actions across emergency risk management such as risk assessment, prevention (including hazard and vulnerability reduction), preparedness, response, recovery and reconstruction.

Doubling Digital Opportunities: Enhancing the Inclusion of Women and Girls in the Information Society



This publication frames the challenges and opportunities we face in achieving gender equality in an era of rapid technological change. A report by the Broadband Commission Working Group on Broadband and Gender, published in September 2013.

It closely examines critical gender issues with respect to new information and communication technologies (ICTs) and broadband. Most important, it shows ways in which we can further advance the sustainable development agenda by promoting the use of new technologies in support of gender equality and women’s empowerment.
 
Related publication:
 
The ICT Opportunity for a Disability Inclusive Development Framework - Synthesis report of the ICT Consultation in support of the High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development of the 68th Session of the United Nations General Assembly | September 2013. Download Report.

From Exclusion to Equality: The Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a Handbook for Parliamentarians



This is a handbook for parliamentarians on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol. Published by the Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities - United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN-DESA) and Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), 2007

Parliaments and parliamentarians have a key role to play in promoting and protecting human rights. This Handbook aims to assist parliamentarians and others in efforts to realize the Convention so that persons with disabilities can achieve the transition from exclusion to equality. The Handbook seeks to raise awareness of the Convention and its provisions, promote an appreciation of disability concerns, and assist parliaments in understanding the mechanisms and frameworks needed to translate the Convention into practice.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework



Synthesis report of the ICT Consultation in support of the High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development of the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly | September 2013

In today’s world, with the ubiquitous impact of ICTs across all sectors of activities in all countries, no one should be excluded from using mobile phones, the Internet, televisions, computers, electronic kiosks and their myriad of applications and services including in education, political life, and cultural activities or for e-government or e-health. The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework contributes to a better understanding of the extent to which information and communication technologies (ICTs) enable and accelerate the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities. It highlights that when ICTs are available, affordable and accessible, they significantly improve access to all aspects of society and development.

The Global Information Technology Report 2013: Growth and Jobs in a Hyperconnected World



The Global Information Technology Report 2013 is a project within the framework of the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network and the Industry Partnership Programme for Information and Communication Technologies. It is the result of a collaboration between the World Economic Forum and INSEAD.

The Networked Readiness Index, calculated by the World Economic Forum, and INSEAD, ranks 144 economies based on their capacity to exploit the opportunities offered by the digital age. This capacity is determined by the quality of the regulatory, business and innovation environments, the degree of preparedness, the actual usage of ICTs, as well as the societal and economic impacts of ICTs. The assessment is based on a broad range of indicators from Internet access and adult literacy to mobile phone subscriptions and the availability of venture capital. In addition, indicators such as patent applications and e-government services gauge the social and economic impact of digitization.

OHCHR Report 2012: United Nations Human Rights Annual Report



In 2013, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) celebrates 20 years of existence. Searching for lasting solutions to human rights challenges forms part of the human rights mechanisms’ role. Published by OHCHR 2013

In 2012, we observed growing emphasis on human rights within the international discourse on peace and security and development. At the inational level, progress was achieved through new laws and improved institutional frameworks in numerous countries. Throughout the world, a collective consciousness on human rights, in many ways spurred by the Arab Spring, continued to gain momentum.

UNICEF The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities



Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities – as the personal essays in this volume attest. Published by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) May 2013

Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), governments around the world have taken upon themselves the responsibility of ensuring that all children, irrespective of ability or disability, enjoy their rights without discrimination of any kind.

The World in 2013: ITU's ICT Facts and Figures



The latest ICT Facts and Figures which show continued and almost universal growth in ICT uptake. Every day we are moving closer to having almost as many mobile- cellular subscriptions as people on earth. The mobile revolution is m-powering people in developing countries by delivering ICT applications in education, health, government, banking, environment and business.

In 2013, there are almost as many mobile-cellular subscriptions as people in the world, with more than half in the Asia-Pacific region (3.5 billion out of 6.8 billion total subscriptions). As global mobile-cellular penetration approaches 100% and market saturation is reached, growth rates have fallen to their lowest levels in both developed and developing countries. Mobile-cellular penetration rates stand at 96% globally; 128% in developed countries; and 89% in developing countries.

UNESCO Global Report: Opening New Avenues for Empowerment - ICTs to Access Information and Knowledge for Persons with Disabiltiies



Building on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Global Report addresses strong recommendations to all stakeholders – from decision-makers to educators, civil society and industry – on how concretely to advance the rights of people living with disabilities. These recommendations draw on extensive research and consultations. Studies launched in five regions have allowed UNESCO to understand more clearly the conditions and challenges faced by persons with disabilities around the world. UNESCO Report published in February 2013

The overall aims of this report are:
  • To provide governments, civil society, industry, academia and other groups with an insight into the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) by persons with disabilities to access information and knowledge around the world;
  • To present an overview and critical assessment of existing information policies and strategies as well as challenges and advantages in using ICTs to access information and knowledge for persons with disabilities;
  • To identify practices at local, national and global levels on effective application of ICTs by persons with disabilities to access information and knowledge;
  • To foster future frameworks on the use of ICTs to access information and knowledge of persons with disabilities (PWD); and
  • Based on the best available information and analysis, to make recommendations for strategy formulation, action-oriented initiatives and new synergies at national, regional and international levels.

ITU-UNESCO State of Broadband 2012: Achieving Digital Inclusion for All



With this Report, the Broadband Commission expands awareness and understanding of the importance of broadband networks, services, and applications for generating economic growth and achieving social progress. A report by the Broadband Commission, September 2012

The Broadband Commission for Digital Development promotes the adoption of broadband-friendly practices and policies for all, so everyone can take advantage of the benefits offered by broadband. The Report recognizes a clear need for policy leadership to establish a strong vision among stakeholders and prioritize the deployment of broadband at the national level. However, additional growth in access is needed to achieve the targets for individual Internet user penetration. Smartphones and mobile broadband may provide the much-needed impetus to achieve this extra growth.
 
Also see:
 
UNESCO Broadcast Commission: Education, Technology and Broadband - Advancing the Education for All Agenda | Download PDF.
 
Federal Communications Commission (FCC): Broadband Use and Adoption in America Report | Download PDF.

UNESCO Broadcast Commission: Education, Technology and Broadband - Advancing the Education for All Agenda



The ability of broadband to improve and enhance education, as well as students’ experience of education, is undisputed. A good and well-rounded education is the basis on which future livelihoods and families are founded, and education opens up minds, as well as job prospects. A report by the Broadband Commission Working Group on Education, published January 2013

The report begins with a brief overview of the rationale for expanding and improving the use of ICTs in education. It stresses that participation in the global economy is increasingly dependent on the 21st-century skill of navigating the digital world. However, traditional school curricula tend to prioritize the accumulation of knowledge above its application, and many systems fail to adequately train students in how to become responsible digital citizens, or prepare them to sustain their employability throughout their lives in a knowledge economy.

The report includes six recommendations for policy makers:
1. Increase access to ICTs and broadband
2. Incorporate ICTs into job training and continuing education
3. Teach ICT skills and digital literacy to all educators and learners
4. Promote mobile learning and open educational resources
5. Support the development of content adapted to local contexts and languages
6. Work to bridge the digital divide

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities (Accessibilité de la téléphonie et des services mobiles pour les personnes handicapées)



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

Thematic Study on the Work and Employment of Persons with Disabilities



The present study focuses on the work and employment of persons with disabilities. It analyses relevant provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, highlights good practices in promoting employment opportunities for persons with disabilities, and identifies the main challenges that States parties encounter in ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy access to, retention of and advancement in employment on an equal basis with others | Annual report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Published December 2012

Article 27 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities sets out the right to work of persons with disabilities; it constitutes one of the most detailed provisions of the Convention, establishing the legal framework for State obligations in relation to work and employment of persons with disabilities. The right of persons with disabilities to work implies an obligation on the part of States parties to create an enabling and conducive environment for employment, in both the public and private sectors.
 

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific



The Incheon Strategy provides the Asian and Pacific region, and the world, with the first set of regionally agreed disability-inclusive development goals. It builds on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and will enable the Asian and Pacific region to track progress towards improving the quality of life, and the fulfilment of the rights, of the region’s 650 million persons with disabilities. Published by United Nations ESCAP, 2012.

Similar to the Millennium Development Goals, the Incheon goals and targets are time-bound for accelerating implementation by focusing particular attention on the achievement of a set of priority goals and targets during the course of the new Decade, 2013–2022, as well as facilitating the measurement of progress to be attained by countries and territories in the Asia-Pacific region.
 
Also see: CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report, 2nd Edition, published by G3ict and Disabled Peoples' International 

Accessible Communications: Tapping the Potential in Public ICT Procurement Policy



Australia has a history of early adoption for all things digital. While information and communications technologies continue to advance in ever-shortening development cycles, advances in technologies that are usable and accessible by people with disabilities struggle to keep up | Published by University of Wollongong and GSA Information Consultants - 2012

This University of Wollongong research project, funded by the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN), explores how government procurement policy can have positive implications for many consumers with disability; providing greater access to the digital economy of the 21st Century. The report explores the connection between government purchasing (usually called public procurement) of information and communications technologies (ICTs) and improving outcomes for people with disabilities.
 
The findings from this research support the introduction of accessibility criteria in the procurement of ICTs and related services. The case studies detail the benefits of including mandatory accessibility criteria in public procurement policy but found that voluntary accessibility criteria did not produce similar effects to mandatory criteria. Indeed, the report argues that the mainstreaming of ICT accessibility criteria through mandatory application is potentially transformative.

CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report



A G3ict-DPI Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version (3.8 MB) | Second edition 2012

The CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report includes the latest data on 52 countries representing 77.4 percent of the World Population. The report offers disability advocates, governments, civil society and international organizations - monitoring the progress of the implementation of the Convention by States Parties - a unique benchmarking tool that collects data on country laws, policies, and programs pertaining to accessible and assistive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) around the globe.  All results are available cross-tabulated by region, level of income per capita of Human Development Index to facilitate benchmarking by advocates and policy makers.
 

Accelerating Development Using the Web: Empowering Poor and Marginalized Populations



This book explores the fundamental factors that are shaping the use of the Web for social and economic development. It describes the contributors that shape how the Internet grows, and how the Web can be made available to and effective for those billions in need. It addresses issues currently restricting access to the Web — political, technological, economic, cultural and linguistic — and suggests what mechanisms can be brought to bear to accelerate its utilization for poor and under-served populations.

This is a book about both ICTs and the World Wide Web. While the Web is one application of many existing on top of the Internet, it is the application that provides the principal window through which users increasingly access ICTs and which is evolving to permeate many aspects of daily life. It therefore deserves significant attention for its potential in making further significant contributions to assisting poor and underserved individuals and communities throughout the world.
 
Also read: Web Accessibility Policy Making: An International Perspective (3rd Edition, 2012). Download report.

ILO-Irish Aid Case Study on Ethiopia: Disability Inclusion through Effective Legislation and Policies



For nearly a decade, the ILO-Irish Aid Partnership Programme has been working with Ethiopia's Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MOLSA) to raise awareness of the need for review and reform of legislation and policy on disability and employment | ILO-Irish Aid | March 2012

Over the past four years in Ethiopia, several factors have played a pivotal role in intensifying the focus on disability and better understanding the barriers faced by disabled persons. At the international level, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which came into force in 2008 and was ratified by Ethiopia in 2010, stimulated much discussion on the implications of the new international human rights instrument and how it might be utilized to support disability-inclusive policies and practices. At the national level, the synergies and complementarities created by two recent instruments - "Right to Employment of Persons with Disability" and the Growth and Transformation Plan for 2011-2015 - provide a framework for more effective participation of disabled persons in Ethiopian society and embrace a disability perspective. Together, all three instruments help to strengthen and support legal protection, policymaking and inclusive planning for development.

Making Television Accessible - Polish Edition



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | Polish translation courtesy: National Broadcasting Council of Poland (Krajowej Rady Radiofonii i Telewizji) | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives, regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV.

Accessible ICTs and Personalized Learning for Students with Disabilities: A Dialogue among Educators, Industry, Government and Civil Society



On 17-18 November 2011, UNESCO in cooperation with Microsoft Corporation convened a consultative two day meeting of 30 experts from more than 10 countries. The participants included teachers working with children with learning difficulties and physical disabilities, school administrators, experts from the IT industry, representatives from non-governmental organizations and disabled persons organizations. This report is an outcome of the meeting | UNESCO Communication and Information Sector Knowledge Societies Division, November 2011

Personalized learning requires attention to the unique needs of all students of all abilities, acknowledging that each have different learning styles including students with mild, moderate or severe disabilities. The use of technology in education plays a particularly vital role by enabling flexible curriculum development and assisting students with disabilities to participate as equals in the learning experience. It also helps to prepare them for life-long learning, recreation and work outside of school. As the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities continues to be implemented globally, State Parties to the Convention continue efforts to realise the goal of Inclusive Education to ensure that students with disabilities have full access, on an equal basis with other students, to regular schools and teachings.

Freedom Guide: Paving the Way Towards Free Movement for Persons with Disabilities



This publication provides an overview of the implications of the rights recognized by the European Union Treaties linked to Free movement of persons, goods and services, for persons with disabilities. The Freedom Guide concretely aims to illustrate the fact that Freedom of movement is still not a reality for persons with disabilities. European Disability Forum | December 2011

Persons with disabilities often face accessibility barriers when they want to go to work, to attend school or, for example, go to vote. Such barriers also impede their full and equal participation in leisure, sports and cultural activities. In 2011, EDF launched a Top Campaign on the theme ‘Freedom of movement’, focusing on the Free Movement of persons, as well as goods and services within the European Union. This campaign aims at removing the main barriers to Freedom of movement that persons with disabilities daily face.

This publication uses data derived from a survey launched by EDF during the summer 2011. This survey intends to generate a clearer picture of the experiences for persons with disabilities in relation to Freedom of Movement. It was completed by individuals with disabilities and/or family members of persons with disabilities who need support to represent themselves.

ILO Report - Disability in the Workplace: Employers' Organizations and Business Networks



Employers’ organizations and business networks can play a major role in providing technical advice and services that help employers to hire, manage and retain employees with disabilities | ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities and Skills and Employability Department 2011

Disability in the Workplace: Employers’ Organizations and Business Networks provides insights into how representative organizations of business address the issue of disability. The practices described in these examples demonstrate how such organizations are well placed to link business interests and the productive integration of people with disabilities in the labour market. At a moment when countries are rapidly ratifying and seeking to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a comprehensive human rights convention for people with disabilities, there are increasing needs to provide inspiration and guidance for businesses. Disability in the Workplace: Employers’ Organizations and Business Networks responds to an emerging body of information that supports the business case for hiring people with disabilities and the interest of companies to maintain diverse workforces.

ILO Report - Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices



Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices describes the contemporary experiences of 25 companies and their work on the issue of disability | ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities and Skills and Employability Department 2010

Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices is timely for many reasons. It comes in the wake of a major global economic crisis, yet the companies profiled have nevertheless given strength to their disability and diversity initiatives. It provides inspiration and guidance to companies at a time when countries are ratifying and seeking to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities ‐ a comprehensive human rights Convention for people with disabilities that will require some changes in national policies and practices related to work and employment. Disability in the Workplace: Company Practices also responds to an emerging body of information that supports the business case for hiring people with disabilities and the interest of companies to maintain diverse workforces.

Enabling Access for Persons with Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies



Enabling Access for Persons with Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies is an editorial publication released on the conference of the same name in January 2012 in Bangalore, India. It compiles best practices, case studies and personal stories of overcoming barriers to inclusion in higher education and employment for persons with disabilities.

With the intent of generating awareness and creating an atmosphere of equal opportunity towards inclusivity at academic institutions and workplaces across India, this publication - released on the occasion of the Enabling Access conference - is an initiative in bringing the key stakeholders of industry, NGOs and educational institutes together on a platform where best practices and case studies can be discussed.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Understanding Web Accessibility: A Guide to Create Accessible Work Environments



This handbook provides insights and tips on what a company needs to do for ICT accessibility and the potential benefits that thus accrue.

Web accessibility simply means that the web pages are usable by all and also on different devices. Web Accessibility Guidelines are popularly known as WCAG 2.0. The website www.w3.org/wai not only provides these guidelines, but also provides links to testing the websites and suggests changes that need to be made in order to make a website compliant to WCAG 2.0. Whenever, a new website or web-based user interface is created or updated, one must insist that the web developers make the site WCAG 2.0 compliant. Having this deliverable as part of the contract would help ensure execution of the task.
 
This publication is released by NASSCOM Foundation and has been made possible with the support of the Wadhwani Foundation.

Travelling with Hearing Loss Research



Travelling with Hearing Loss, commissioned by the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf, aims to establish what people with hearing loss want in terms of tourism products and services, and to offer a better understanding of Access Tourism as a legitimate tourism market.

In 2011, the New Zealand National Foundation for the Deaf (NFD) commissioned the New Zealand Tourism Research Institute (NZTRI) to conduct research into the tourism, travel, and hospitality experiences and needs of people with hearing impairments.

Hearing impairment ranges from slight hearing loss to total loss. The research was led by Dr. Sandra Rhodda, Research Programme Leader in Access Tourism. The research included two surveys, one for residents of New Zealand and one for residents of countries other than New Zealand who are deaf or have hearing loss and who are 20 years old or older. The aim of the research was to find out what it is like to travel with hearing loss, and how the travel experiences of hearing impaired people can be improved.

 

Review of International Best Practices in Accessible Public Transportation for Persons with Disabilities



This United Nations Development Programme publication covers easy to long-term practices for improving access in transport. It discusses the elements of accessibility, road and pedestrian environments, vehicle design and operation, stops and stations, signage and information, and training and policies | Kementerian Pembangunan Wanita, Keluarga dan Masyarakat Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development

One of the articles of the Convention, which is also the subject of this report, is the core issue of accessibility. Article 9 of the Convention requires countries to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers and ensure that persons with disabilities can access their environment, transportation, public facilities and e-services, and information and communications technologies. More importantly, the Convention approaches issues of persons with disabilities from a rights-based approach. Hence, Article 9 also speaks about the importance of enabling persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life, which will not be possible, if accessibility is not fully ensured.
 
This report provides an international overview of the key technical issues on accessible public transportation for persons with disabilities. It begins with a brief description of the prevalence of disability and factors that influence accessibility. It also explains why safe and convenient pedestrian infrastructure is particularly essential for persons with disabilities if they wish to satisfactorily access public transport.

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

In the midst of this telecommunication revolution, however, populations of senior citizens and persons living with disabilities have been left out due to accessibility factors: complex human interfaces difficult to understand and activate for persons with cognitive impairments or learning disabilities, lack of alternative communications for persons living with low vision, blind, hard of hearing or deaf, or, quite often handset ergonomics too difficult for persons with physical disabilities such as dexterity or mobility limitations.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

Making Television Accessible



This report has been prepared by Peter Olaf Looms, Chairman ITU-T Focus Group on Audiovisual Media Accessibility, in cooperation with G3ict | November 2011

Ensuring that all of the world’s population has access to television services is one of the targets set by world leaders in the World Summit on the Information Society. Television is important for enhancing national identity, providing an outlet for domestic media content and getting news and information to the public, which is especially critical in times of emergencies. Television programmes are also a principal source of news and information for illiterate segments of the population, some of whom are persons with disabilities. In addition, broadcasting can serve important educational purposes, by transmitting courses and other instructional material.

The emphasis of this report is on making digital media accessible. This report identifies accessibility solutions for media executives,  regulators and policy makers, pay-TV operators, consumer electronics manufacturers, sales outlets as well as disabled persons  organizations. The goal of this report is to assist ITU members to take the necessary steps to ensure that persons with disabilities  can enjoy their CRPD right to access TV. 

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - Polish version  
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

 

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook



The goal of “Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator’s Handbook” is to provide guidance to cultural administrators on accessibility and inclusion for creating new or opening up existing programs to include individuals with disabilities and older adults, whether as staff, volunteers, program participants or audience members. Produced by: National Endowment of the Arts, National Endowment of the Humanities, National Assembly of State Art Agencies, and John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Since the disability rights movement rose to prominence in the 1970s, federal legislation has been passed, and disabled individuals are finally becoming part of the cultural mainstream. Great strides have been made, particularly in architectural and program access. Many Americans with disabilities now have the opportunity to create and participate fully in the arts and humanities. Much work, however, remains to be done.
 
“Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook” represents an update of the Arts Endowment's "The Arts and 504” (1992) with additional information from the 700-page “Design for Accessibility: An Arts Administrator’s Guide” produced by the Arts Endowment and NASAA in 1994. This resource is designed to help you not only comply with Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but to assist you in making access an integral part of your organization’s planning, mission, programs, outreach, meetings, budget and staffing.

The Effectiveness of M-Health Technologies for Improving Health and Health Services: A Systematic Review



This systematic review will summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-Health) around the world. Authors: Caroline Free, Gemma Phillips; Lambert Felix; Leandro Galli; Vikram Patel; Philip Edwards; BMC Research Notes

M-health, the use of mobile computing and communication technologies in health care and public health, is a rapidly expanding area of research and practice. M-health programmes and interventions use mobile electronic devices (MEDs), such as personal digital assistants and mobile phones, for a range of functions to support health behaviour change and chronic disease management by patients in the community.
 
This systematic review will provide recommendations on the use of mobile computing and communication technology in health care and public health and will guide future work on intervention development and primary research in this field.

Accessible Content: Best Practices Guide for Digital Environments



Video description should offer equivalent access to film, television and online content in multi-platform environments for people who are blind or have low vision. Publication by Analysis and Research in Communications, ARC and Media Access Canada.

The purpose of video description is to support and reflect the entertainment qualities of the content through description of the visual stimuli and style conveyed. 
 
Visual elements that are often overlooked by describers include title and end credits, subtitles and captions. Commercials and online content that stand alone or serve to support a program should also be described. Visual elements necessary to understand and enjoy the entertainment experience are described in this publication. 

ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities - UNESCO IITE and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education



The Practice Review 'ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities' has been published as part of the IITE ‘ICTs in Education: Best Practices’ series.

How Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can be used in the most effective ways for education of people with disabilities is currently high on the political agendas of all countries, particularly those who have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (CRPD, 2006). A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate. In this context, the application of ICT is very important as it plays an essential role in supporting high quality education for learners with disabilities.

With this in mind, the UNESCO Institute for Information Technology in Education (UNESCO IITE) and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education (the Agency) agreed in 2010 to combine their expertise in this field and collaborate on the development of a Review of innovative practice. The intention for the review was to build on findings from past work – notably UNESCO IITE’s activities in this area and in particular ICTs in Education for People with Special Needs: Specialized Training Course (2006) and the Agency’s ICT in Special Needs Education project related work. 

Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion



Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies | September 2011

While businesses sometimes encounter serious challenges as they seek to implement inclusion strategies, many employers have overcome these hurdles with robust and creative practices. Through the Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion initiative, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN®) invited business leaders to share their successful disability inclusion strategies. This publication highlights successful strategies that can be used by businesses of all sizes to create a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and supply chain. Real-life examples, such as these, are important to help businesses realize the wide range of opportunities available and the potential for replicating success.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

Implementation of Convention of Rights of Persons with Disability - Role of the UN and Other International Organizations



In this presentation initially developed for the Dynamic Coalition on Disability and Development of the Internet Governance Forum, Peter Major, Special Adviser, Permanent Mission of Hungary to the United Nations in Geneva, reviews the institutional bodies, initiatives and programs currently involved in supporting the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities among United Nations affiliates and related international organizations. A clear, concise and useful roadmap for all involved in international cooperation in matters of disability rights.


Shifting Perspectives: Opening Up Museums and Galleries to Blind and Partially Sighted People



Shifting Perspectives: Opening up museums and galleries to blind and partially sighted people, a research initiative of CultureLink, supported by RNIB (2011)

The museum experience of disabled people is beginning to be talked of as a human and cultural right. Indeed, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by the UK in 2009, recognises the right of disabled people to take part in culture “on equal terms”. This is a major shift.

Shifting Perspectives, seeing disabled people as part of the design solution and not the problem, will renew museums. This user-focused report gives a step-by-step approach to making cultural institutions accessible to the blind and partially sighted people.

The Clear Print Standard: Arguments for a Flexible Approach



This report makes recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version of the Clear Print guidelines published by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) for adoption within the public sector.

As well as Large Print for people with impaired vision, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) also publishes Clear Print guidelines for general use. These have been widely adopted in the public sector. In these notes we take a critical look at what they say about type size, and the evidence on which the standard is based. We support the idea of a minimum type size for normal text, but question the inflexibility which inhibits some organisations from using even slightly smaller sizes for diagrams and tables – features that can make information clearer. We make recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version.

FCC-EAAC Report on Emergency Calling for Persons with Disabilities, 2011



This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010

This report, presented by the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission), contains the findings of an in-depth review and analysis of a national survey of persons with disabilities conducted by the EAAC in accordance with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA), signed into law by President Obama on 8 October 2010.

The CVAA requires the Commission to take various steps to ensure that people with disabilities have access to emerging communications technologies in the 21st century. The Commission established the EAAC in accordance with the CVAA, which directs that an advisory committee be established within 60 days after the date of enactment, for the purpose of achieving equal access to emergency services by individuals with disabilities as part of our nation’s migration to a national Internet protocol-enabled emergency network, also known as the next generation 9-1-1 system.

Sightsavers Policy Paper - Making Inclusive Education a Reality



Sightsavers policy paper 'Making Inclusive Education a Reality' comprehensively discusses the merits of incorporating inclusive education in mainstream schools for children with visual impairment within the broader context of universal access to education.

Sightsavers policy paper 'Making Inclusive Education a Reality' comprehensively discusses the merits of incorporating inclusive education in mainstream schools for children with visual impairment within the broader context of universal access to education.

All people have a right to education. There is no single model for ensuring that ducation is inclusive and approaches continue to evolve. Inclusive education is an approach that ensures the presence, participation and achievement of all students in education. This may be in formal schools, or in non-formal places of learning, such as extra-curricular clubs and humanitarian camps. Sightsavers aim is to see increased access to an education system that fully meets the needs of visually impaired children and enables them to become productive and fulfilled members of society, whilst working to ensure that all disabled children have the opportunity to receive a quality education within a wider education system.

This policy paper was written by Juliette Myers and Sunit Bagree.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

WHO-World Bank "World Report on Disability"



More than one billion people face some form of disability, says a UN report developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank.

The World Report on Disability, developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank, with contributions from over 380 experts, urges governments to “to step up efforts to enable access to mainstream services and to invest in specialized programmes to unlock the vast potential of people with disabilities.”

“Disability is part of the human condition,” said WHO Director-General Margaret Chan at a ceremony in UN headquarters to launch the report. “Almost every one of us will be permanently or temporarily disabled at some point in life.”

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

Text Version - CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility 2010



A G3ict Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Text Version | 2010

The CRPD Progress Report on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) accessibility is a unique benchmarking tool that identifies the degree to which each of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on ICTs and Assistive Technologies (ATs) is actually enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impact. It includes data points relative to the status of ICT accessibility and ATs availability among ratifying countries. Data collected measure:

# State Party CRPD legal and programmatic commitments
#
State Party capacity for implementation
# Assessment of the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities

Download the text version. You can also download the PDF version here.

PDF version - CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility 2010



A G3ict Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version | 2010

2012-09-13 The CRPD Progress Report on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) accessibility is a unique benchmarking tool that identifies the degree to which each of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on ICTs and Assistive Technologies (ATs) is actually enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impact. It includes data points relative to the status of ICT accessibility and ATs availability among ratifying countries. Data collected measure:

# State Party CRPD legal and programmatic commitments
#
State Party capacity for implementation
# Assessment of the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities

Download the PDF version. You can also download the Text version here.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

National Accessibility Standard in the Russian Federation: A First Step toward Creating a Barrier-Free Internet



by Anatoliy D. Popko, Head of the Information Technology Department, “Rehacomp” on-Governmental Institution of Professional Rehabilitation and Training of the All-Russian Society of the Blind; Anatoliy J. Kamynin, Founder and Administrator of the Tiflocomp.ru portal, a leading Russian Internet resource on Adaptive Technology for the Blind and Visually Impaired, April 2010; Reproduced with the kind permission from the “Information Society Magazine” translated from Russian to English by UNIC Moscow.

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

AGE-ANEC-EDF Response to the European Commission's Communication "Towards an Accessible Information Society" (COM/2008/804 final)



AGE-ANEC-EDF Response to the European Commission's Communication "Towards an Accessible Information Society."

ICT have a crucial role to play in everyday life of consumers of all ages and abilities and are gateways to education, work and leisure. Therefore, AGE, the European Older People’s Platform, ANEC, the European consumer voice in standardisation, and the European Disability Forum (EDF) are responding to the European Commission (EC)’s Communication “Towards an accessible information society”.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Meeting Information and Communications Technologies Access and Service Needs for Persons with Disabilities



Written by Cynthia D. Waddell, Juris Doctor (ICT Expert for Persons with Disabilities, International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet), the background paper was originally prepared for the seminar "Sharing Experience on Best Practices and Services for People with Disabilities," held on 17 September 2007 in Geneva, Switzerland. This paper has been updated and includes the addition of the Arab Region based on presentations at the first Arab Regional Conference on Sharing Experience on Best Practices in ICT Services for Persons with Disabilities held in Cairo, Egypt, 13-15 November 2007. It was presented at the ITU Regional Workshop on "ICT Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities in the African Region" held in Lusaka, Zambia (July 15-16, 2008).

Assessment of the Status of eAccessibility in Europe



This Executive Summary of Measuring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe (MeAC) is a report from a study commissioned by the European Commission in 2006 as a follow up to the eAccessibility Communication of 2005. The basic aim was the provide an evidence base to support the future deveopment of EU policy in the eAccessibility field.

Web Accessibility in Context, an Investigation into Standardisation Issues



This study has set out to investigate the apparent gap between current published guidelines on accessibility and the current practice of web developers, and the tools used by the developers to create accessible websites.

European e-Inclusion Initiative: First Contributions to the Campaign (Lisbon, 3 December 2007)



The European Commission's first publication on its European e-Inclusion Initiative.

ITU Report of the First Global G3ict Forum Meeting (New York, 26 March 2007)



This document contains the report of the 26 March Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies Forum in New York. It was written by Mr. Greg Ratta, who participated in the Forum on behalf of the ITU.

OAS/Trust - POETA: From a Pilot Project to a Hemispheric Initiative



Rene Leon's PowerPoint presentation given at the first G3ict Global Forum (New York, 26 March 2007)

Moving Towards a Fully Inclusive Digital Europe



EICTA, founded in 1999, is the voice of the European technology industry. This brochure provides an overview of the need for accessible technologies in the European technology industry while profiling several companies that are currently highly active in effort towards accessible technology. Companies featured include Adobe, Epson, HP, IBM, JVC, MediXine, Microsoft, Motorola, Nokia, Oracle, Panasonic, RIM, SAP, SIEMENS, Sony, and Sun Microsystems.

Suppliers Declaration and ICT Accessibility



Explains the new European Council's new conformity assessment system of "Supplier's Declaration of Conformity" (SDoC). Discusses the role of SDoC in eAccessibility and the benefits of Internal Accessibility Training to allow manufacturers to monitor their own accessibility standards.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.