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Publications & Reports

Enabling Access for Persons With Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies



The enrollment percentages of children with disabilities into the primary and secondary education systems in India are extremely low. The challenges are many – the lack of accessible facilities, accessible lesson content, sensitive teachers who are competent to deal with their physical, intellectual and emotional needs, and inclusive assessment methodologies are top-of-the-line issues. These contribute to a huge drop out rate for the already minuscule percentage of children with disabilities who manage to get to school in the first place.

This journal is a voice from across the nation and outside, in three broad areas: ˜
  • Crucial difference between existing educational environments and inclusive/enabling ones;˜
  • Understanding what it means to ensure equal access, be sensitive to student needs, and redefine how we build educational environments;˜
  • How can Indian campuses become inclusive to be globally competent and competitive.

Model Policy for Inclusive ICTs in Education for Persons with Disabilities



The publication has been drafted by Amanda Watkins of the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (www.european-agency.org) with the technical support of Axel Leblois of G3ict, on previous work from UNESCO and G3ict, as well as information collected during the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) +10 Review Event, February 2013, in particular the working group meetings “Towards WSIS+10 and Beyond: Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Knowledge Societies”, cohosted by UNESCO and G3ict.

This document presents a Model Policy for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Education for Persons with Disabilities. The focus is upon the use of ICTs to support the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD, 2006), specifically:
  • Article 9: Accessibility;
  • Article 21: Freedom of Expression and Opinion, and Access to Information;
  • Article 24: Inclusive Education.

Zero Project Report 2014: International Study on the Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities



Our mission is working for a world with zero barriers. Worldwide, the Zero Project finds and shares models that improve the daily lives and legal rights of all persons with disabilities. The focus of the year 2014 is accessibility.

The 20 indicators from the 'Convention Questionnaire' measure the implementation of some of the most important rights (articles) of the UN CRPD. Analyse the answers of experts in currently 132 countries, shown on world maps.
 
Also see: CRPD 2013 ICT Accessibility Progress Report - researched by G3ict and DPI | Download Report.

Equal Right, Equal Opportunity - Inclusive Education for Children with Disabilities



Inclusive education can raise the quality bar across education systems, by using strategies that cater for naturally diverse learning styles of all students, whilst accommodating the specific learning needs of some students. Published by Global Campaign for Education and Handicap International, December 2013

When a disabled child does get the opportunity to receive a quality education, doors are opened. This enables them to secure other rights throughout their lifetime, fostering better access to jobs, health and other services. For education to play this role as ‘an
enabling right’, it must be of high quality, available equitably, built to tackle discrimination and allow each child to flourish according to their own talents and interests.

Towards an Inclusive and Accessible Future for All



Persons with disabilities have a significant positive impact on society, and their contributions can be even greater if we remove barriers to their participation. With more than one billion persons with disabilities in our world today, this is more important than ever. Published by United Nations Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, New York, 2013

While data on disability remain a challenge, there is compelling evidence of the barriers that persons with disabilities face in achieving economic and social inclusion. As the 2015 deadline for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the global community is discussing a new development framework that will build on the progress catalysed by the Millennium Declaration.

Human Rights Watch Report: Barriers Everywhere: Accessibility for People with Disabilities in Russia



This report highlights obstacles such as the inability of people with physical disabilities to leave their homes due to lack of ramps and elevators, employers’ unwillingness to hire people with disabilities, and inadequate visual and auditory announcements on buses for people with sensory disabilities. Human Rights Watch urges Russia to make meaningful reforms to transportation, housing, and workplaces, among other facets of society | Published by Human Rights Watch, September 2013

Russia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 and will host the Winter Paralympics in March 2014. Despite these high profile steps the government has taken to demonstrate its commitment to accessibility, people living with disabilities in Russia face challenges carrying out basic daily tasks, including going to work or to school, visiting the doctor, shopping for groceries or medicine, attending cultural events, or socializing with friends.

UNICEF The State of the World's Children 2013: Children with Disabilities



Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities – as the personal essays in this volume attest. Published by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) May 2013

Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), governments around the world have taken upon themselves the responsibility of ensuring that all children, irrespective of ability or disability, enjoy their rights without discrimination of any kind.

A Practical Guide for People with Disabilities Who Want to go to College



This guide will teach prospective students to plan for picking the right school, the type of degree you should pursue to get the jobs you want, pay for school and secure additional funding if necessary, and plan for paying back loans for tuition. Authors: Roody McNair, BA, and Arlene Solomon, MS, CRC, CPRP, Horizon House Employment Services | A project of Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities

How can post-secondary education help you later in life? One word: Jobs. We live in a world of “increasing credentials,” where
it is becoming harder and harder for people to fi nd work without the specialized training offered in post-secondary college programs. This guide was developed to help people with a limited knowledge of educational opportunities after high school secure the resources and support networks they need to give them the best chance for success.

UNESCO Broadcast Commission: Education, Technology and Broadband - Advancing the Education for All Agenda



The ability of broadband to improve and enhance education, as well as students’ experience of education, is undisputed. A good and well-rounded education is the basis on which future livelihoods and families are founded, and education opens up minds, as well as job prospects. A report by the Broadband Commission Working Group on Education, published January 2013

The report begins with a brief overview of the rationale for expanding and improving the use of ICTs in education. It stresses that participation in the global economy is increasingly dependent on the 21st-century skill of navigating the digital world. However, traditional school curricula tend to prioritize the accumulation of knowledge above its application, and many systems fail to adequately train students in how to become responsible digital citizens, or prepare them to sustain their employability throughout their lives in a knowledge economy.

The report includes six recommendations for policy makers:
1. Increase access to ICTs and broadband
2. Incorporate ICTs into job training and continuing education
3. Teach ICT skills and digital literacy to all educators and learners
4. Promote mobile learning and open educational resources
5. Support the development of content adapted to local contexts and languages
6. Work to bridge the digital divide

United Nations Resource: Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in all Aspects of Development Efforts



The concept of mainstreaming disability in development is broadly defined as the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development efforts. The concept of inclusive development is enshrined in article 32 of the CRPD—the first stand-alone provision on international cooperation in a core human rights treaty | Published by the United Nations, November 2011

This document is divided into four main sections. Following a brief introduction, section II will focus on the initial criteria for the assessment of best practices. Section III presents a number of recommendations, suggesting also how the United Nations can facilitate the process of mainstreaming disability and persons with disabilities in development and highlighting the interlinkages between the mainstreaming of disability and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and section IV contains 26 case studies from across the globe.

iPads for Communication, Access, Literacy and Learning (iCALL)



Mobile devices such iPads, iPods and iPhones have taken the world by storm and are increasingly used in teaching and learning, and/or in therapy, to support learners with additional support needs, as well as for personal use. Published by CALL Scotland, The University of Edinburgh | September 2012

The primary aim of the Guide is to offer support to readers who are not necessarily technical specialists and who want to use the iPad with children or adults with some kind of additional support needs, special educational needs or disability.
 
The book includes chapters on:
  • Getting to grips with the iPad
  • Apps to support teaching & learning
  • Accessibility Options
  • iPad Accessories
  • iPad Resources
  • iPad in Assessments and Exams
  • Managing & Implementing the iPad
  • Glossary of Terms
  • iPad Management using iTunes: some useful tips

Visit the publication page on CallScotland.org for recent updates

Helping to Ensure Equal Access To Education



A major factor contributing to the growth of a country is the need to properly educate the next generation. In order for this to be done successfully, the needs of all students must be met, regardless of their race, sex or disability. This report from the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) discusses their improvements in addressing this issue. Published by the U.S. Department of Education - Office for Civil Rights, November 2012

The report cites three major themes that have been the focus of their new approach:

• Greater Productivity to Meet a Rising Caseload - new internal systems of management, enhancements to the  investigatory processes, increased the heft of their monitoring capacity and the scope of the issues it addresses
• Supporting Equity Throughout the Department - taking a leadership role in the Secretary's Equity and Excellence Commission, participation in Secretary Duncan's senior-most advisory and decision-making committees
• Maximum Impact, Maximum Engagement - published robust and reader-friendly policy guidance documents that provide schools and colleges with detailed interpretations of the laws they must follow

Accessible Communications: Tapping the Potential in Public ICT Procurement Policy



Australia has a history of early adoption for all things digital. While information and communications technologies continue to advance in ever-shortening development cycles, advances in technologies that are usable and accessible by people with disabilities struggle to keep up | Published by University of Wollongong and GSA Information Consultants - 2012

This University of Wollongong research project, funded by the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN), explores how government procurement policy can have positive implications for many consumers with disability; providing greater access to the digital economy of the 21st Century. The report explores the connection between government purchasing (usually called public procurement) of information and communications technologies (ICTs) and improving outcomes for people with disabilities.
 
The findings from this research support the introduction of accessibility criteria in the procurement of ICTs and related services. The case studies detail the benefits of including mandatory accessibility criteria in public procurement policy but found that voluntary accessibility criteria did not produce similar effects to mandatory criteria. Indeed, the report argues that the mainstreaming of ICT accessibility criteria through mandatory application is potentially transformative.

CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report



A G3ict-DPI Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version (3.8 MB) | Second edition 2012

The CRPD 2012 ICT Accessibility Progress Report includes the latest data on 52 countries representing 77.4 percent of the World Population. The report offers disability advocates, governments, civil society and international organizations - monitoring the progress of the implementation of the Convention by States Parties - a unique benchmarking tool that collects data on country laws, policies, and programs pertaining to accessible and assistive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) around the globe.  All results are available cross-tabulated by region, level of income per capita of Human Development Index to facilitate benchmarking by advocates and policy makers.
 

National Council on Disability: Progress Report 2011



This annual progress report by the National Council on Disability (NCD) describes the current state of people with disabilities in America. Findings are based on information gathered through a variety of events with NCD stakeholders; the most recent figures from an extensive set of national data indicators measuring the quality of life of people with disabilities in the United States; and recent studies and reports from NCD | National Council on Disability, October 2011

This report contains many recommendations for improving the quality of life of people with disabilities. Given that the comprehensive reform of our nation‘s approach to disability policy will be a long-term process, immediate priority should be given to the recommendations that will lead to better education outcomes and increased employment and independent living opportunities for people with disabilities.
 
Also see: The Accessibility Imperative: Challenges and Opportunities of Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Download report for free.

PEW Report: Americans Living with Disability and their Technology Profile



Using the internet can be a challenge for people living with disabilities. Two percent of American adults say they have a disability or illness that makes it harder or impossible for them to use the internet. The Pew Internet Project provides the following data as context for the continuing conversation about who does – and does not – use the internet in the U.S., including a proposal to extend the enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to include websites operated by certain entities. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project | January 2011

Statistically speaking, disability is associated with being older, less educated, and living in a lower-income household. By contrast, internet use is statistically associated with being younger, college-educated, and living in a higher-income household. Thus, it is not surprising that people living with disability report lower rates of internet access than other adults. However, when all of these demographic factors are controlled, living with a disability in and of itself is negatively correlated with someone’s likelihood to have internet access.

The Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in School Accountability Systems



Formerly excluded from measures of educational performance, students with disabilities (SWDs) are now explicitly recognized in federal and state accountability systems. At the national level, the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) laid the foundation for accountability of SWDs by requiring states to include these students in state and district assessments and to report their participation and performance. Published by the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education | May 2012

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education (ED) has a congressional mandate to conduct a national assessment of how well the IDEA is achieving its purposes. As part of the national assessment of IDEA, this study is intended to provide policy-relevant information about the education of SWDs by examining their inclusion in school accountability systems, the use of school practices that may relate to their educational outcomes, and SWD’s achievement in relation to school accountability status.

Special Education Needs and Inclusion: Reflection and Renewal



Following a range of concerns raised by members about issues related to SEN and inclusion, the NASUWT commissioned research to examine these issues. This literature review represents the first stage of this research | Research Report by Simon Ellis, Professor Janet Tod and Lynne Graham-Matheson, Canterbury Christchurch University, for and published by National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers | UK, 2008

The report looks at interpretations of inclusion including local authority interpretations and how this translates into policy and practice, at different understandings of the term ‘special educational needs’, at teacher attitudes to inclusion, at classroom practice and teachers’ training and development needs, and at issues of behaviour SEN and inclusion. The NASUWT was also keen to look at what has happened across the UK and the report compares policies and practice in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

Implementing Inclusive Education: A Commonwealth Guide to Implementing Article 24 of the UNCRPD (Second Edition)



The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities requires the development of an inclusive education system for all. This revised and expanded second edition of Implementing Inclusive Education examines the adoption of the Convention and provides examples of how inclusive education systems for all children have been established in pockets throughout the Commonwealth and beyond | Commonwealth Secretariat, London | 2012 (Second Edition)

Article 24 of the UNCRPD requires the development of an inclusive education system at all levels, where children and students with disabilities can be part of their local school alongside their non-disabled peers, with the right support and accommodation to develop academically and socially. It has been necessary to revise and update this publication as more countries have since signed and ratified the Convention.

Transforming Learning Through mEducation



Mobile technology is raising the quality of education and improving access to it. Early initiatives in mobile education, or “mEducation” are already enhancing learning outcomes worldwide. With growing availability and demand, mEducation is poised to become a USD 70 billion market by 2020 | GSMA and McKinsey & Company | 2012

We define mEducation as technology-enabled learning solutions available to learners anytime, anywhere. Any portable device, such as a tablet, laptop or mobile phone, that provides access to educational content through mobile connectivity (2G, 3G, or 4G complemented by mobile-based Wi-Fi) can be a tool for mEducation. Mobile technology’s power to transform education is difficult to overstate, given the importance and impact of learning that takes place outside a traditional classroom environment.

Accessible Publishing - Best Practice Guidelines for Publishers



The publishing landscape is becoming much more user-oriented; ensuring your published content is accessible by all your potential readers is more and more important. Providing “access” to content for people with print impairments is a challenge that all publishers can and should be tackling. The aim of this publication is to supply publishers with clear and concise guidance to assist them in these endeavors | April 2011

Making sure that your products are accessible makes good business sense, commercially, legally and ethically. With the right people, processes and practices in place you can increase the size of your market while at the same time enhancing your Corporate Social Responsibility profile at the same time. Our guidelines encourage publishers to make their mainstream publications as accessible as possible so that full access becomes the norm rather than being “special”.

Accessibility - A Guide for Educators by Microsoft



This guide from Microsoft provides information about accessibility and accessible technology to help educators worldwide ensure that all students have equal access to learning with technology | Microsoft Corporation | Edition 3.1, published in 2011

In the era of personalized learning where we shift the focus from what is being taught, to what is being learned, the student’s needs and style become more central. Personalized learning requires attention to the unique needs of all students—particularly students with learning difficulties or physical disabilities. As students are encouraged to take greater responsibility for their learning, and for using technology to acquire new skills, schools have a responsibility to provide accessible technology that can be personalized for each student’s needs. For educators new to accessibility and working with students with disabilities, accessibility can seem overwhelming. To help educators teach students with all types of abilities, you will find specific information about each type of impairment and accessible technology solutions.

The Global Economics of Disability



The intent of this paper is to inform those grappling with how to position disability as a new market segment, and speak to the market in an economic context | Fifth Quadrant Analytics and Return on Disability Company | March 2012

Making up 1.1 billion people globally, Persons with Disabilities represent a sizeable population. Unlocking the potential in this large subset of the global community has serious ramifications for GDP, public and private institutional cash flows and how economies grapple with an aging population. The familiar emerging market investing question must be asked: when does this market tip? When does the global platform of disability mirror the scope and revenue generating power of Green?

Implementation of Universal Design for Learning and the Use of Accessible Technology to Improve the Learning of all Students



Statement report by Dr John B. Quick, superintendent of Bartholomew Consolidated Schools, Corporation (BCSC) in Columbus, Indiana to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions in February 2012

UDL is a curriculum designing tool that helps teachers design lessons that will be accessible to all students. There are three overarching principles (engagement, representation, and action and expression). Each is broken down into nine guidelines (three under each principle). The guidelines help teachers select teaching strategies, methods and accessible technologies, which will, when combined, create an accessible learning environment.
 
Because instructional goals might involve the use of technology, it is expected that teachers choose whether or not to utilize accessible technology to align with the standards-based goals they have determined for their lessons. Specifically, accessible technology must be chosen based on the framework of UDL.

Technology Accessibility in the Postsecondary Environment



Statement of Mark Turner, Director Center for Accessible Media, California State University, before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, “The Promise of Accessible Technology | February 7, 2012

The accessibility issues encountered by students with disabilities in a postsecondary environment are the result of a combination of factors including (1) the student’s specific functional impairments, (2) the specific instructional and administrative programs/services with which they interact, and (3) the level and nature of accessibility support provided by those programs/services. For this reason, the campus Disability Services program meets with each CSU student to establish an individualized plan of services that constitute ‘reasonable accommodations’.
 
These services are essential for the success of students with disabilities. By addressing accessibility gaps in university programs/services, postsecondary institutions ensure students have the opportunity to fully utilize curricular materials, demonstrate a mastery of their curriculum, and develop the skills necessary for future employment.

Accessible ICTs and Personalized Learning for Students with Disabilities: A Dialogue among Educators, Industry, Government and Civil Society



On 17-18 November 2011, UNESCO in cooperation with Microsoft Corporation convened a consultative two day meeting of 30 experts from more than 10 countries. The participants included teachers working with children with learning difficulties and physical disabilities, school administrators, experts from the IT industry, representatives from non-governmental organizations and disabled persons organizations. This report is an outcome of the meeting | UNESCO Communication and Information Sector Knowledge Societies Division, November 2011

Personalized learning requires attention to the unique needs of all students of all abilities, acknowledging that each have different learning styles including students with mild, moderate or severe disabilities. The use of technology in education plays a particularly vital role by enabling flexible curriculum development and assisting students with disabilities to participate as equals in the learning experience. It also helps to prepare them for life-long learning, recreation and work outside of school. As the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities continues to be implemented globally, State Parties to the Convention continue efforts to realise the goal of Inclusive Education to ensure that students with disabilities have full access, on an equal basis with other students, to regular schools and teachings.

The Promise of Accessible Technology: Challenges and Opportunities



Statement of Eve Hill, Senior Counselor to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights, Department of Justice presented before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, United States Senate concerning the "Promise of Accessible Technology: Challenges and Opportunities" | US Department of Justice | February 2012

Excerpt from the report: When Congress enaxted the ADA and Section 504, the internet and electronic and information technologies as we know them today – the ubiquitous sources of information, commerce, services, and activities – did not exist. For that reason, although the ADA and Section 504 guarantee the protection of the rights of individuals with disabilities in a broad array of activities, neither law expressly mentions the internet or contains specific requirements regarding developing technologies. When Congress amended the Rehabilitation Act in 1998, it added what is now known as section 508. That provision specifically requires Federal government agencies to ensure that their electronic and information technologies, including their websites, are accessible to individuals with disabilities.
 
Watch the video transcription of the Senate Committee meeting here.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – What Role for Philanthropy?



The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – what role for Philanthropy? is a paper presented by Professor Gerard Quinn, Director, Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway at the 2010 International Human Rights Funders Group conference held at San Francisco, California.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is anchored on the view that the person with the disability is not the problem.  Remember what Theresia Degener says – traditional disability law and policy ‘problematizes the person’. The problem resides in how third parties (including the State) reacts to disability. This is reflected in the definition of disability in Article 1 of the Convention: disability does not exist in the abstract. It is a function of how impairment is compounded by arbitrary barriers placed in front of people.

Enabling Access for Persons with Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies



Enabling Access for Persons with Disabilities to Higher Education and Workplace: Role of ICT and Assistive Technologies is an editorial publication released on the conference of the same name in January 2012 in Bangalore, India. It compiles best practices, case studies and personal stories of overcoming barriers to inclusion in higher education and employment for persons with disabilities.

With the intent of generating awareness and creating an atmosphere of equal opportunity towards inclusivity at academic institutions and workplaces across India, this publication - released on the occasion of the Enabling Access conference - is an initiative in bringing the key stakeholders of industry, NGOs and educational institutes together on a platform where best practices and case studies can be discussed.
 
Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

In the midst of this telecommunication revolution, however, populations of senior citizens and persons living with disabilities have been left out due to accessibility factors: complex human interfaces difficult to understand and activate for persons with cognitive impairments or learning disabilities, lack of alternative communications for persons living with low vision, blind, hard of hearing or deaf, or, quite often handset ergonomics too difficult for persons with physical disabilities such as dexterity or mobility limitations.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities: Recommendation or Mandatory Treaty?



The Information Society Project at Yale Law School Releases White Paper Addressing the Proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities

This Working Paper addresses the proposed WIPO International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities. The authors conclude that if WIPO wants to achieve compliance, this proposed instrument should be binding hard law. Enacting this agreement as soft law would undermine the goal of making copyrighted works accessible to persons with print disabilities.
 
Authors: Margot Kaminski, Yale University - Yale Information Society Project; Yale University - Information Society Project; Yale University - Law School; Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Yale Law School; ONO Academic College; Yale University - Information Society Project

Accessibility of Social Networking Services



Discapnet’s Observatory on ICT Accessibility has been carrying out sectoral studies on the accessibility of Web portals since 2004. This December 2010 report by Discapnet, Technosite and Fundacion ONCE, surveys present status of accessibility to social networking services for persons with disabilities.

Anybody with access to Internet and basic knowledge of how to use such tools is a potential user of social networking services. It is therefore a duty of the managers of such services to ensure accessibility, both to the services themselves and to the information they generate, under equal conditions for all users, including people with functional diversity.
 
The study on the Accessibility of Social Networking Services on Internet carried out by the Observatory offers a panorama of the current level of accessibility of the most widespread social networking services in Spain, with the aim of providing their managers with a diagnosis to help them improve accessibility, and their users with a breakdown of what each service has to offer.

Related Blog: Social Media and Accessibility by Debra Ruh. Read Here.

Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook



The goal of “Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator’s Handbook” is to provide guidance to cultural administrators on accessibility and inclusion for creating new or opening up existing programs to include individuals with disabilities and older adults, whether as staff, volunteers, program participants or audience members. Produced by: National Endowment of the Arts, National Endowment of the Humanities, National Assembly of State Art Agencies, and John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Since the disability rights movement rose to prominence in the 1970s, federal legislation has been passed, and disabled individuals are finally becoming part of the cultural mainstream. Great strides have been made, particularly in architectural and program access. Many Americans with disabilities now have the opportunity to create and participate fully in the arts and humanities. Much work, however, remains to be done.
 
“Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrator's Handbook” represents an update of the Arts Endowment's "The Arts and 504” (1992) with additional information from the 700-page “Design for Accessibility: An Arts Administrator’s Guide” produced by the Arts Endowment and NASAA in 1994. This resource is designed to help you not only comply with Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but to assist you in making access an integral part of your organization’s planning, mission, programs, outreach, meetings, budget and staffing.

The Design of Human-Powered Access Technology



In this paper, the authors frame recent developments in human computation in the historical context of accessibility, and outline a framework for discussing new advances in human-powered access technology. Authors: Jeffrey P. Bigham, Richard E. Ladner and Yevgen Borodin.

People with disabilities have always overcome accessibility problems by enlisting people in their community to help. The Internet has broadened the available community and made it easier to get on-demand assistance remotely. In particular, the past few years have seen the development of technology in both research and industry that uses human power to overcome technical problems too difficult to solve automatically.
 
The paper presents a set of 13 design principles for humanpowered access technology motivated both by historical context and current technological developments. We then demonstrate the utility of these principles by using them to compare several existing human-powered access technologies. 

ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities - UNESCO IITE and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education



The Practice Review 'ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities' has been published as part of the IITE ‘ICTs in Education: Best Practices’ series.

How Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can be used in the most effective ways for education of people with disabilities is currently high on the political agendas of all countries, particularly those who have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (CRPD, 2006). A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate. In this context, the application of ICT is very important as it plays an essential role in supporting high quality education for learners with disabilities.

With this in mind, the UNESCO Institute for Information Technology in Education (UNESCO IITE) and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education (the Agency) agreed in 2010 to combine their expertise in this field and collaborate on the development of a Review of innovative practice. The intention for the review was to build on findings from past work – notably UNESCO IITE’s activities in this area and in particular ICTs in Education for People with Special Needs: Specialized Training Course (2006) and the Agency’s ICT in Special Needs Education project related work. 

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons With Disabilities (Russian Version)



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

UNIC Moscow (United Nations Information Centre - Moscow) has translated the English version of the kit to Russian. For more information on the translation initiative by UNIC Moscow visit: http://www.unic.ru/news_inf/viewer.php?uid=164

Shifting Perspectives: Opening Up Museums and Galleries to Blind and Partially Sighted People



Shifting Perspectives: Opening up museums and galleries to blind and partially sighted people, a research initiative of CultureLink, supported by RNIB (2011)

The museum experience of disabled people is beginning to be talked of as a human and cultural right. Indeed, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by the UK in 2009, recognises the right of disabled people to take part in culture “on equal terms”. This is a major shift.

Shifting Perspectives, seeing disabled people as part of the design solution and not the problem, will renew museums. This user-focused report gives a step-by-step approach to making cultural institutions accessible to the blind and partially sighted people.

The Clear Print Standard: Arguments for a Flexible Approach



This report makes recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version of the Clear Print guidelines published by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) for adoption within the public sector.

As well as Large Print for people with impaired vision, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) also publishes Clear Print guidelines for general use. These have been widely adopted in the public sector. In these notes we take a critical look at what they say about type size, and the evidence on which the standard is based. We support the idea of a minimum type size for normal text, but question the inflexibility which inhibits some organisations from using even slightly smaller sizes for diagrams and tables – features that can make information clearer. We make recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version.

Sightsavers Policy Paper - Making Inclusive Education a Reality



Sightsavers policy paper 'Making Inclusive Education a Reality' comprehensively discusses the merits of incorporating inclusive education in mainstream schools for children with visual impairment within the broader context of universal access to education.

Sightsavers policy paper 'Making Inclusive Education a Reality' comprehensively discusses the merits of incorporating inclusive education in mainstream schools for children with visual impairment within the broader context of universal access to education.

All people have a right to education. There is no single model for ensuring that ducation is inclusive and approaches continue to evolve. Inclusive education is an approach that ensures the presence, participation and achievement of all students in education. This may be in formal schools, or in non-formal places of learning, such as extra-curricular clubs and humanitarian camps. Sightsavers aim is to see increased access to an education system that fully meets the needs of visually impaired children and enables them to become productive and fulfilled members of society, whilst working to ensure that all disabled children have the opportunity to receive a quality education within a wider education system.

This policy paper was written by Juliette Myers and Sunit Bagree.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Text Version - CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility 2010



A G3ict Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Text Version | 2010

The CRPD Progress Report on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) accessibility is a unique benchmarking tool that identifies the degree to which each of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on ICTs and Assistive Technologies (ATs) is actually enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impact. It includes data points relative to the status of ICT accessibility and ATs availability among ratifying countries. Data collected measure:

# State Party CRPD legal and programmatic commitments
#
State Party capacity for implementation
# Assessment of the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities

Download the text version. You can also download the PDF version here.

PDF version - CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility 2010



A G3ict Report Assessing the Degree of Compliance of States Parties with the ICT Accessibility Provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PDF Version | 2010

2012-09-13 The CRPD Progress Report on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) accessibility is a unique benchmarking tool that identifies the degree to which each of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on ICTs and Assistive Technologies (ATs) is actually enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impact. It includes data points relative to the status of ICT accessibility and ATs availability among ratifying countries. Data collected measure:

# State Party CRPD legal and programmatic commitments
#
State Party capacity for implementation
# Assessment of the State’s implementation and actual results for persons with disabilities

Download the PDF version. You can also download the Text version here.

e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities



The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010.

The Toolkit and its companion handbook have contributions from more than 60 experts around the world on ICT accessibility and is a most valuable addition to policy makers and regulators, advocacy and research organisations and persons with disabilities on the implementation of the ICT dispositions of the CRPD.

The handbook is a joint publication of ITU, G3ict and the Centre for Internet and Society, in cooperation with The Hans Foun­da­tion. The book is com­piled and edit­ed by Nir­mi­ta Narasimhan. Preface by Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, Sec­re­tary-​Gen­er­al, In­ter­na­tion­al Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tion Union. Introduction by Dr. Sami Al-​Basheer, Di­rec­tor, ITU-D. Foreword by Axel Leblois, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, G3ict.

Braille and Daisy formats available here: http://g3ict.org/resource_center/e-Accessibility%20Policy%20Handbook

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.
 

UNESCO Consultative Meeting on Mainstreaming ICTs for Persons With Disabilities to Access Information and Knowledge



UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), conducted a consultative expert meeting to discuss how UNESCO could assist its Member States in facilitating social inclusion of persons with disabilities through information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Eighty-nine countries have ratifi ed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), committing them to ensuring that persons with disabilities enjoy all human rights on an equal basis. A number of the general principles included in the CRPD are directly linked to UNESCO’s mandate.

In order to facilitate the implementation process of the CRPD, UNESCO, in cooperation with the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict), organized a consultative meeting on 22-23 February 2010 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

This report provides an overview of the background and rationale for this meeting, and a description of the process for and content of this meeting, is well as the outcomes of this meeting and their implications for action by UNESCO.

A Case Study of One of the Most Successful Programs Designed by a Higher Education Institution to Promote Employability among Students Living with Disability



Written by Professor Licia Sbattella, President's Delegate for Disabilities at Politecnico di Milano, Italy, this case study will be presented at the 4th Shafallah International Forum on Children with Special Needs: Achieving Independence, Doha, Qatar, April 20-22.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

"See it right" publication for Clear Print - RNIB



Guidelines for Editing for Low Vision Readers - Some guidance regarding styles for leaflet from the "See it right" publication for Clear Print from the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) - not a standard, but research-based.

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.

Summary of the Discussion Draft of the “21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act”



Summary of the discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act", which aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

U.S. 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act Discussion Draft



The discussion draft of the bill entitled "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" aims to establish new safeguards for disability access to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind as technology changes and the United States migrates to the next generation of Internet-based and digital communication technologies.

IGDA Accessibility in Games: Motivations and Approaches



White paper from the International Game Developer's Association describing the necessity and steps to be taken in order to make gaming accessible to those with disabilities.

The Accessibility Imperative: DAISY Format



Accessibility Imperative, DAISY, G3ict research paper

The Accessibility Imperative is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

With 129 countries having signed the convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

This audio version of the publication conforms to DAISY standards (Digital Talking Books) and is accessible to visually-impaired or otherwise print-disabled persons. The DAISY version has been made possible due to the efforts of the Danish National Library for the Blind. Click on this link to access the DAISY format.

Please note: The DAISY link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library for the Blind. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds. If this does not happen, press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.